The Crucifixion and the Death of Jesus; Matthew 26:14-27:66

Manila Bulletin, March 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

The Crucifixion and the Death of Jesus; Matthew 26:14-27:66


THEN the soldiers of the governor took Jesus inside the praetorium and gathered the whole cohort around Him. They stripped off His clothes and threw a scarlet military cloak about Him. Weaving a crown out of thorns, they placed it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. And kneeling before Him, they mocked Him, saying, "Hail, King of the Jews!" They spat upon Him and took the reed and kept striking Him on the head. And when they had mocked Him, they stripped Him of the cloak, dressed Him in His own clothes, and led Him off to crucify Him.

As they were going out, they met a Cyrenian named Simon; this man they pressed into service to carry His cross.

And when they came to a place called Golgotha (which means Place of the Skull), they gave Jesus wine to drink mixed with gall. But when He had tasted it, He refused to drink. After they had crucified Him, they divided His garments by casting lots; then they sat down and kept watch over Him there. And they placed over His head the written charge against Him: This is Jesus, the King of the Jews. Two revolutionaries were crucified with Him, one on His right and the other on His left. Likewise the chief priests with the scribes and elders mocked Him and said, "He saved others; He cannot save Himself. So He is the king of Israel! Let Him come down from the cross now, and we will believe in Him. He trusted in God; let Him deliver Him now if He wants Him. For He said, I am the Son of God." The revolutionaries who were crucified with Him also kept abusing Him in the same way.

From noon onward, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon. And about three oclock Jesus cried out in a loud voice, "Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?" which means, "My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?" Some of the bystanders who heard it said, "This one is calling for Elijah." Immediately one of them ran to get a sponge; he soaked it in wine, and putting it on a reed, gave it to Him to drink. But the rest said, "Wait, let us see if Elijah comes to save Him." But Jesus cried out again in a loud voice, and gave up His spirit. And behold, the veil of the sanctuary was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth quaked, rocks were split, tombs were opened, and the bodies of many saints who had fallen asleep were raised. The centurion and the men with Him who were keeping watch over Jesus feared greatly when they saw the earthquake and all that was happening, and they said, "Truly, this was the Son of God!"

No different from the crowd

The apostles do not have any inkling that something bad would befall their Lord and Master that week. …

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