Supreme Court Affirms RTC Ruling Ordering

Manila Bulletin, March 26, 2005 | Go to article overview

Supreme Court Affirms RTC Ruling Ordering


Byline: REY G. PANALIGAN

A farmer in Villasis, Pangasinan did not live long enough to see that justice is done for the losses he incurred when his tractor was hit by a speeding passenger bus in 1990, but the Supreme Court still rendered justice to the heirs of the late Sinforoso Macalinao with a ruling affirming the award of damages.

Through Justice Angelina Sandoval Gutierrez, the High Court directed the regional trial court (RTC) to enforce its decision ordering the Philippine Rabbit Bus Lines Inc. to pay the heirs of Macalinao P72,000 for the damaged tractor and P10,000 for lawyers fees.

The High Court said that Macalinaos case should not have been elevated to it on appeal because the issues raised by the bus company did not involve questions of law.

"In fine, let it be stressed upon the parties that the Supreme Court is not a tryer of facts," it said.

"It is only when the findings of a trial court are grounded entirely on speculation, surmises, or conjectures; when a lower courts inference from its factual findings is manifestly mistaken, absurd, or impossible; when there is grave abuse of discretion in the appreciation of facts; when the findings of the appellate court go behind the issues of the case, run contrary to the admissions of the parties to the case, or fail to notice certain relevant facts which, if properly considered, will justify a different conclusion; when there is misappreciation of facts; or when the findings of facts are conclusions without mention of the specific evidence on which they are based, are premised on the absence of evidence or contradicted by the evidence on record" can there be exceptions that only questions of law may be raised before the Supreme Court," it said.

In Macalinaos case, no exception was found to warrant its elevation to the Supreme Court, it added. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Supreme Court Affirms RTC Ruling Ordering
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.