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Senator Saxby Chambliss examines the current debate regarding America's intelligence capabilities in "We Have Not Correctly Framed the Debate on Intelligence Reform." The glaring intelligence failures leading up to 9/11, combined with our inability to correctly assess Saddam's weapons of mass destruction programs and his relationship with other Islamist terrorists, led the Administration and the Congress to attempt a rapid overhaul of our intelligence community and its accompanying capabilities. The author outlines his concern that, as with any reform of this nature, it is the manner in which the debate is framed that will determine the final success or failure of the process. Senator Chambliss examines several critical capabilities and relationships key to successful intelligence reform, chief among which is the role of the new Director of National Intelligence (DNI), and concludes there is a need to focus on four critical points: (1) The necessity to recognize current weaknesses in the field of human intelligence (HUMINT) and to take the appropriate corrective actions. (2) The need to improve congressional oversight of the intelligence process through the establishment of subcommittees within the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. (3) A requirement to reorganize military intelligence to allow for unity of command and an efficient relationship with the new DNI. (4) Finally, the need to improve current capabilities related to the sharing of intelligence.

Colin Gray provides an introspective analysis of warfare since the end of the Cold War and reminds the reader that the essential "nature" of war is unchanging. The author begins his article "How Has War Changed Since the End of the Cold War?" with a number of caveats necessary to place the warnings that appear later in the article in the proper context. These caveats range from the requirement to understand that war is far more than the simple exercise of military power, to such matters as the danger inherent in preparing for the wrong strategic future. Gray examines eight points related to how war has changed, and how it has not. He concludes with a number of arguments that summarize his exploration. First, the "objective" nature of war is not changing. Second, it's essential to view the context of war beyond the simple application of military power. Third, war is as much about the peace that follows as it is about combat. Finally, military strategists and planners need to understand that trends decline and expire over time and that "surprise" does happen.

Professor George Quester's "Demographic Trends and Military Recruitment: Surprising Possibilities" affords the reader insight into many of the factors affecting the ability of the armed services to recruit over the upcoming decade. The author explores such variables as the "graying" of America, lower birthrates in developed nations, shifts in populations to urban areas, and higher birthrates in underdeveloped countries to predict extreme stress on the recruitment of military-age personnel. He suggests a number of alternatives to current recruiting and personnel management practices based on the evolving nature of war and the increased use of technology. Quester analyzes an increase in the number of women in military service, extension of current service obligation and retention policies, greater reliance on new immigrants to the United States, and recruitment abroad as possible solutions for the diminishing number of military-age personnel. The author goes on to conclude that current demographic projections, even if only partially correct, demand radical changes in the recruitment and retention policies of all the services.

The thematic presentation "Shaping Strategy for a New Era" contains three articles related to the development of strategic thought in a rapidly evolving and asymmetric world. The first article in this triumvirate is Dr. Steven Metz and Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Millen's "Intervention, Stabilization, and Transformation Operations: The Role of Landpower in the New Strategic Environment. …

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