From the Editor


Italica's 2004 pedagogical issue is devoted to the teaching of Theater in Italian classes. The articles featured span the range from theoretical to practical exemplifications of the use of theater in an Italian class, and offer in-depth critical analysis as well as concrete suggestions on how to utilize specific texts in a class of Italian language and culture. I would like to thank Nicoletta Marini-Maio and Colleen Ryan-Sheutz for having conceived, coordinated, and organized the various topics. Italica's Associate Editor for Pedagogy, Michael Lettieri, has been invaluable in his incessant work: he suggested the names of the specialized readers and has carefully read, commented, and edited each of the articles himself. His cooperation was also substantial in shaping the Book Review Section, and he should be recognized as the co-Editor of this issue, although the responsibility for mistakes and omissions is fully mine, of course.

The reader will note the "In Memoriam" for Glenn Pierce, the cherished colleague at the University of Missouri, who died unexpectedly on October 5, 2004. This issue seems to be the perfect place to remember Glenn, who worked extensively on both theater and pedagogy. Glenn died in his beloved Milan, where he was spending his sabbatical. He joked, once, that not even Stendhal could claim to love Milan as much as he did: because he, Glenn, loved it despite the modern nuances caused by traffic and pollution. It is with sadness and pride that in this issue we publish Glenn's last review written for Italica. …

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