Staggered Olympic Games Not as Costly to Teams

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

Staggered Olympic Games Not as Costly to Teams


Byline: J. Hope Babowice

You wanted to know

Tyler Erlandson, 10, of Libertyville wanted to know:

Why aren't the Winter Olympics in the winter of '04?

If you have a question you'd like Kids Ink to answer, write Kids Ink, care of the Daily Herald, 50 Lakeview Parkway, Suite 104, Vernon Hills, IL 60061 or send an e-mail to lake@@dailyherald.com. Along with the question, include your name, age, phone number, hometown, grade and school.

For more information

To learn more about the Olympics, the Fox Lake District Library suggests

- "Great Moments in the Olympics" by Michael Burgan

- "The First Olympic Games" by Barbara Christensen

- "The Grolier Student Encyclopedia of the Olympic Games" by Ron Thomas and Joe Herron

"Why aren't the Winter Olympics in the winter of '04?" asked Tyler Erlandson, 10, a fifth-grader at Rockland School in Libertyville.

The drive to be the best is at the core of the human spirit. Competitive events like those offered in the Olympic Games have been a part of every culture and civilization.

The first Olympic event, held in Greece to honor the god Olympus, was a footrace. Top athletes from warring countries put down their weapons to compete in sporting events instead of on a battle field.

The modern Olympics began in 1896 with summer events only. Nearly 250 athletes from 14 countries tried to top each other in nine different sports. Olympic organizers decided to hold the events once very four years in various locations across the globe. In 1908, figure skating was added to the list of Olympic offerings. …

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