Aviation Force Gets Smaller, but New Aircraft Spending on Course

By Erwin, Sandra I. | National Defense, April 2005 | Go to article overview

Aviation Force Gets Smaller, but New Aircraft Spending on Course


Erwin, Sandra I., National Defense


Both Navy and Marine Corps aviation forces will see a slight drop in the size of the fleet, but production of new aircraft will continue at a healthy pace, said Rear Adm. Thomas J. Kilcline Jr., director of the Navy Air Warfare Division.

The Navy and Marine Corps, which now own 2,786 aircraft, will see that number dip to 2,709 in 2006, and 2,641 in 2007.

The intent is to replace aging aircraft with fewer, but more technologically advanced systems. In fiscal year 2006, the Navy requested funds to buy 138 new airplanes. "We are doing pretty good," Kilcline said. He compared the current budget with the financially grim days of the mid-1990s, when the Navy forecast about 40 to 60 new airplanes per year. The current projections--which are likely to be revised--show new aircraft buys exceeding 200 per year by the end of the decade.

Despite delays in the MV-22 Osprey and the Joint Strike Fighter programs, the overall level of aircraft production will remain high. Kilcline told National Defense. Boosting the numbers will be a surge in the manufacturing of T-6 training aircraft. Beginning in 2007, the Navy will begin purchasing nearly 50 per year. "We need those," Kilcline said, to replace the outdated T-34s.

As the Pentagon's budget proposal gets digested on Capitol Hill, one of the issues causing heartburn among many lawmakers is the termination of the C-130J cargo aircraft program. Kilcline, who oversees both Navy and Marine Corps aviation programs, said the cancellation of the C-130J is bad news for the Marines, who had requested 51 new aircraft. Unless the Defense Department reverses course on this, the Corps would end up with 33 C-130Js, instead of 51. "Congress wants to make sure we get the Marine Corps their allotment," Kilcline said. If the Pentagon and Congress fail to reach an agreement to extend the C-130J contract with Lockheed Martin, the Marine Corps will have to upgrade older C-130s to fill that gap, he added.

Among the winners in this year's budget is the Super Hornet program, which remains on track to deliver 148 aircraft by 2011, and 90 EA-18Gs, to be produced by 2011. The Navy also will purchase 20 E-2C Hawkeye command-and-control aircraft.

Other aviation programs will get fewer aircraft than was previously budgeted. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Aviation Force Gets Smaller, but New Aircraft Spending on Course
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.