Florida High School Taps Questia Classroom for CMS Online Tools: Course Management System Linked to Online Library Powers Interactive Learning Environment

District Administration, April 2005 | Go to article overview

Florida High School Taps Questia Classroom for CMS Online Tools: Course Management System Linked to Online Library Powers Interactive Learning Environment


A new course management system (CMS) for secondary schools--powered by Questia the world's largest online academic library--has become a key part of the ambitious academic and staff-training programs at St. Lucie West Centennial High School in Port St. Lucie (FL), according to Principal Caterina Trimm.

"We've had the [Beta] version of the Questia Classroom for almost a year," says Trimm, "and have discovered an exciting range of applications as we've gone along, including the ability to design lesson plans, interact with online students who have 24/7 access to resource materials that can be viewed simultaneously by multiple users, and--this is probably the most surprising component--outstanding and flexible staff-development tools.

"It's the most exciting new product for high schools in many, many years," she adds.

"St. Lucie West Centennial High School recently was reorganized into four small learning communities or 'States' within our one large school," says Trimm. "Each community has a Governor (Assistant Principal), Lt. Governors (Dept. Heads), student legislators, business partners, parent volunteers and advisory councils. Our goal is to personalize each child's educational experience, helping every student to reach individual academic and career goals. The smaller learning communities model combines rigorous academics, high technology career preparation skills, and democracy. We have totally restructured our learning environment and the interactive Questia Classroom program supports this mission."

The Questia Classroom is the first course management system (CMS) to be attached to a vast scholarly collection of full-text copyrighted and public domain material. Currently offered at no charge to schools purchasing Questia's online library, the Questia Classroom enables teachers to efficiently interact with students online and engage students in a 21st century learning environment. The service allows teachers to create courses, generate and maintain data for each section of a course, add or delete students to and from classes, attach reading resources to assignments, including full-text books and articles, and post assignments accompanied by reading materials from Questia's library or elsewhere, in a safe, secure environment. Students using Classroom can access assignments, read assignments, read faculty comments attached to the assignment, or attach students' own resources to the assignment. …

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Florida High School Taps Questia Classroom for CMS Online Tools: Course Management System Linked to Online Library Powers Interactive Learning Environment
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