Thus Said: How the World Sees Us

American Libraries, October 2004 | Go to article overview

Thus Said: How the World Sees Us


"Twenty years ago, library science was seen as a musty, dead-end profession. No longer. Today's librarians act as detectives, helping patrons to navigate the Internet, remote databases, CD-ROMs, and, of course, books and periodicals to find the information they need." From "Your Brilliant (Second) Career," Consumer Reports Money Advisor, September 2004.

"I think there is a demand for things that are a little less ordinary. It opens up a new door, maybe even to people who haven't been to libraries before." Entertainer CHRIS CAMP on the varied activities that take place today in public libraries, Chicago Tribune, August 25.

"At one time American libraries stood at the heart of community education, forming in a positive way the minds and character of our youth, changing lives for the better. But sadly, the traditional mission of these august institutions of learning for generations of Americans is disappearing as they gradually turn into indoctrination centers against the United States and Israel." LEE KAPLAN from "Librarians For Terror," FrontPageMagazine.com, August 17.

"I think teenagers who want to see porn would go almost anywhere before going to a library." Mount Lebanon (Pa.) High School junior MIKE MI, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, August 23.

"We all recall that Hitlery [former First Lady Hillary Clinton] tried to sneak the Russian Red Army into the country under the guise of reforming the health-care system, but shouldn't we be a bit alarmed as well that a back-country librarian from Level Crossing, Texas, is out there explaining cutting-edge science to the nation?" Boston Globe writer CHARLES PIERCE to Eric Alterman for his Altercation web log on First Lady Laura Bush's comments regarding stem-cell research, MSNBC.com, August 13.

"So the America I loved still exists, if not in the White House or the Supreme Court or the Senate or the House of Representatives or the media. …

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