THE OTHER ROYAL CUCKOLD; Sensational Undiscovered Letters to Wallis Simpson from Her Husband Reveal Him as a Fawning Royalist Who, despite His Passion for Her, Willingly Condoned Her Infidelity with the Prince of Wales. Remind You of Someone?

Daily Mail (London), April 16, 2005 | Go to article overview

THE OTHER ROYAL CUCKOLD; Sensational Undiscovered Letters to Wallis Simpson from Her Husband Reveal Him as a Fawning Royalist Who, despite His Passion for Her, Willingly Condoned Her Infidelity with the Prince of Wales. Remind You of Someone?


Byline: GEOFFREY LEVY;RICHARD KAY

AS BRIGADIER Andrew Parker Bowles was telephoning his exwife Camilla to wish her the very best of luck on the eve of her marriage to the Prince of Wales, a collection of poignant love letters concealed for decades was emerging for the very first time.

Intriguingly, they were written by Ernest Simpson, another husband cuckolded by an earlier Prince of Wales, to his absent wife Wallis.

These extraordinarily historically important letters - at once deeply intimate and hauntingly frank - provide a fascinating insight into upper class morality at the time and the awesome deference to the royals in the Thirties.

Wallis Simpson began her affair with the future King Edward VIII in 1934, and as they edged towards marriage, they ignited a crisis that would lead to abdication.

Yet astonishingly, Ernest Simpson, a shipping agent who had a British father and American mother and served in the Coldstream Guards during World War I, displays neither bitterness nor animosity, towards Wallis. Even more astonishingly, he bears no ill-will towards the pampered prince who took her from him.

On the contrary, although in despair at losing the wife he adored, he is plainly honoured by the Prince's intimate relationship with her.

His letters, revealed here for the first time, reek of deference (if not a touch of sadomasochism) and almost seem to condone the Prince's behaviour, virtually encouraging Wallis to pursue her unique opportunity to be Queen.

His loyalty to Wallis never wavers.

Times have changed since Ernest Simpson wrote these letters some 70 years ago, referring to the Prince as 'that lonely little friend'.

Even so, one has to wonder how these deeply emotional lines, penned soon after Wallis first slipped into the Prince of Wales's bed in 1934, would resonate with Andrew Parker Bowles. Ernest writes: 'IF WHAT you have found proves to be something really beautiful, and time alone will show, then my love can embrace it and incorporate it in all that other beauty which is you.

'If it proves otherwise, then you will need my love and you will find it waiting there. In the meanwhile, I think you do well not to let go of anything you honestly believe to be beautiful, for if you did so, you would always have lingering regrets.

'I would not have you miss anything really fine, my darling, for life offers it to us so seldom . .. Do not speak of my "sacrifice" in the course I have begged you to follow - above all do not deny it to me, for if it is for your happiness one way or another, as I am convinced it is, I shall have so much joy in the giving.' Writing from his room at the Royal Station Hotel in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne where he was on business, Simpson ends his love letter: 'IN MY heart I have nothing but love for you, my dearest one, and, strange to say, a sincere friendship and kindliness for that lonely little friend whose love for you I shall respect so long as he does not let it harm you.

Goodnight, my dearest dear, Ernest.' The story of Edward and Mrs Simpson remains the most dramatic royal love story of the 20th century. For King Edward VIII did what Prince Charles will almost certainly never do - he willingly gave up his throne for love.

Born in 1896 in Baltimore, the daughter of the laundry manageress at The Chevy Chase country club, Bessie Wallis Warfield was 20 when she married U.S.

navy airman Winfield Spencer. He was a violent alcoholic and after five years she left him, obtaining a divorce in 1927.

In 1928 she met Simpson, also a divorcee, and they married in London, where he was working in his father's firm. Through contacts at the American embassy, Wallis became a friend of Lady Thelma Furness, at that time the Prince of Wales's mistress.

LADY Thelma introduced Wallis to the Prince in 1931 and the following year the Simpsons were invited to Fort Belvedere, his turreted home in Berkshire on the edge of Windsor Great Park. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE OTHER ROYAL CUCKOLD; Sensational Undiscovered Letters to Wallis Simpson from Her Husband Reveal Him as a Fawning Royalist Who, despite His Passion for Her, Willingly Condoned Her Infidelity with the Prince of Wales. Remind You of Someone?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.