Penelope Jane Reichardt

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 17, 2005 | Go to article overview

Penelope Jane Reichardt


Penelope Jane Reichardt a longtime resident of Elk Grove Village

A time with the family of Penelope Jane Reichardt will be held from 2 to 5 p.m today, at the home she loved. For more information you may call (847) 640-2017. Funeral services will be held Monday, with fellowship time with the family beginning at 6 p.m., with services by her pastor Dr. Larry Mercer, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at Grove Memorial Chapel, 1199 S. Arlington Heights Road (three blocks south of Biesterfield Road), Elk Grove Village. Penny was born June 20, 1940, in Chicago, Illinois to Henry and Jane (Wilk) Hyler, the firstborn of a family of four: Patricia, Judy and Susan, she died Tuesday, April 12, 2005, at home. Her home life was difficult and a passion to care for others and fierce determination to do whatever that took became a trademark of Penelope Jane. In school, she excelled at art, earning a scholarship to the Art Institute of Chicago. She married her first love, and became the wife of Marvin "Marty" Lubeck. Leaving a small Chicago apartment in the late 60s, Penny and Marty moved into a single family home on Fern Avenue in Elk Grove Village with their daughters, Wendy and Stacy. Penny embodied the woman in Proverbs 31. Again demonstrating the passion to care for others, Penny managed the household finances, sewed clothes for her children, baked cookies with them and had hot chocolate with marshmallows ready when Marty and the girls came in from shoveling the driveway. As picturesque as this sounds, Penny's zest for life exploded outside the white picket fence of suburban living. Penny championed the importance of imagination and fantasy. After putting the kids to bed, Penny the artist would emerge and explore every medium she encountered: oil painting, acrylics, watercolors, charcoal drawings, and pastels. She loved to create miniatures, always leaving out any miniature people so that, in her words, the person looking at the miniatures could lose themselves in that world. She would lose herself in books, exploring philosophy, archeology, and her favorite, murder-mysteries. Whether reading Nero Wolf or watching Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes, Penny's inquisitive nature always worked to figure out "whodunit." Penny also developed a passion for eastern culture, from Japanese gardens and bonsai trees, Chinese artwork and medicine, to late- night Kung Fu movies. After a first baby-step of selling sugar eggs to Alexian Brothers Hospital, she leapt into business ownership by opening a day care center called "Tinkerbelle's Cove" in Claremont grade school in Elk Grove Village. …

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