Attack on Medical Research; Animal-Rights Activism Threatens Lifesavers

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Attack on Medical Research; Animal-Rights Activism Threatens Lifesavers


Byline: David Martosko, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Last week the world celebrated an historic medical research milestone, the 50th anniversary of the polio vaccine. But Hollywood glitterati - including Alec Baldwin, Noah Wyle and Emmylou Harris - dishonored that life-saving moment by celebrating another milestone - the 20th birthday of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM). This is an organization which opposes the very research that made the polio breakthrough possible.

In 1949, Science magazine explained to readers that animals (including mice, oxen and rhesus monkeys) were needed in every phase of polio research. Polio researcher and Nobel laureate Frederick Robbins later wrote that "all we learned about the disease came from studies with animals." And Albert Sabin, the biomedical research veteran who developed the oral polio vaccine, wrote in 1992 that animal experiments "were necessary to solve many problems before an oral polio-virus vaccine could become a reality."

Mainstream medical professionals understand that today's animal-research models are crucial to finding tomorrow's cures. The American Foundation for AIDS Research funds these tests. So do the Pediatric AIDS Foundation, the Alzheimer's Association, the March of Dimes, the American Red Cross, the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation (Race for the Cure), the American Lung Association, the National Kidney Foundation, and on and on.

PCRM advises the public to withhold donations from all of these charities, and nearly 100 others. In order for humans to live, some animals must die. But this group has decided such a trade-off just isn't worthwhile.

Taking this position requires willful blindness. Researchers whose work called for the use of animals have received 69 Nobel Prizes in physiology and medicine. One of these awards went to the scientist who laid the foundation for everything we understand about mad cow disease.

Animal research has led to vaccines for rabies, smallpox, rubella, measles and anthrax. Insulin diabetics owe their quality of life to animal models - which also brought us heart bypasses, organ transplants and the minimally invasive surgical techniques we now take for granted.

Throw it all out, says the Physicians Committee. These advocates of "responsible" medicine view research like this as "unnecessary."

If this anti-science position sounds familiar, it should. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) - those protest-happy lunatics who believe your life is worth no more than that of a cow or a chicken - have a sympathetic take on nearly every message PCRM promotes, including a "do not donate" policy toward health charities that fund animal research. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Attack on Medical Research; Animal-Rights Activism Threatens Lifesavers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.