Your Legs Have Gone, You're Too Old and Too Slow. You Couldn't Even Kiss My a***; EXCLUSIVE DRUNKEN BELLAMY IN TEXT RANT AT SHEARER

Sunday Mirror (London, England), April 24, 2005 | Go to article overview

Your Legs Have Gone, You're Too Old and Too Slow. You Couldn't Even Kiss My a***; EXCLUSIVE DRUNKEN BELLAMY IN TEXT RANT AT SHEARER


Byline: By BRIAN McNALLY and EUAN STRETCH

SOCCER bad boy Craig Bellamy sent a series of abusive text messages to his old Newcastle captain Alan Shearer after going on a bender at a charity golf tournament.

Ex-England striker Shearer, 34, was left "visibly shaken" and "seething" after being taunted by former team-mate Bellamy, 25.

Shearer got the messages just minutes after his team's 4-1 defeat against Manchester United in the FA Cup semi-final last Sunday. They included insults: "Your legs are gone. You're too old. You're too slow."

Another - which made him "turn purple with rage" - reportedly read: "You couldn't even kiss my a**e."

Yesterday a source close to Newcastle Utd said: "Shearer walked into the dressing room and switched on his phone.

"He looked distraught as he checked his messages.

"Bellamy was clearly delighted that Newcastle had been knocked out of the cup.

"He also sent texts to several other players and Kenneth Shepherd, son of the Newcastle chairman.

"But it is the final one to Shearer that has enraged the players - and I don't think Newcastle fans will be happy about it either."

The source added: "Shearer is worshipped as a god in Tyneside.

"There is no way Bellamy could show his face around these parts after what he texted."

It is not the first time fiery Welsh international Bellamy has sent abusive text messages to Shearer. He has also targeted other fellow professionals and managers.

Earlier this year he left an offensive voicemail message on Shearer's phone and sent him a text calling him "F****** goody two shoes."

And he sent abusive texts to Newcastle manager Graham Souness and chairman Freddy Shepherd when they tried to sell him to Birmingham for pounds 6million. It read: "I am Craig Bellamy and I don't sign for s*** football clubs."

The latest texts were sent by Bellamy while he was in Ireland at a testimonial golf tournament for Celtic captain Jackie McNamara.

Dozens of Celtic fans had travelled to the Ballyliffin golf club in Donegal to play a round with their heroes.

Some paid pounds 2,000 to play golf, attend a star-studded gala dinner in the evening and take part in an auction of Celtic sporting memorabilia. But the tournament was a washout due to the appalling weather and some guests and players spent the afternoon drinking instead.

Then some of the Celtic squad then went by coach to the Clan Nari Hotel in Letterkenny to carry on drinking.

A source close to a Celtic player later claimed Bellamy was advised to leave a gala dinner held at the hotel after two "locals" allegedly threatened him. …

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Your Legs Have Gone, You're Too Old and Too Slow. You Couldn't Even Kiss My a***; EXCLUSIVE DRUNKEN BELLAMY IN TEXT RANT AT SHEARER
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