Books as an Art Form Artists Create Their Versions of Literary Works

By Daday, Eileen O. | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), April 6, 2005 | Go to article overview

Books as an Art Form Artists Create Their Versions of Literary Works


Daday, Eileen O., Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Eileen O. Daday Daily Herald Correspondent

Ask a group of artists to create their versions of books, and you get some pretty novel ideas, with some looking more like sculpture than literary works.

That's what visitors to this month's "The Book and Beyond" exhibit at the Northwest Cultural Council in Rolling Meadows will find.

On display will be the creations of 18 Northwest suburban artists who have fashioned their "books" using a variety of media, techniques and styles.

"These are all handmade original books, with some that are very tiny while others are very large," says Kathy Umlauf, executive director. "They are very unusual and really quite gorgeous."

The free show opens with an artists' reception from 2-4 p.m. April 17. The free reception features musical entertainment provided by Bill and Sue Pasquale, guitar and voice, at 3 p.m., and refreshments.

The exhibit takes over the Northwest Cultural Council's office and adjoining Kimball Hill Galleries, 5999 New Wilke Road, Suite 307, Rolling Meadows. After the reception, the exhibit is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday through May 26.

Participating artists hail from Arlington Heights, Barrington, Buffalo Grove, Chicago, Des Plaines, North Barrington, Rolling Meadows, Roselle, Streamwood and Wheaton.

Exhibitors range from Ellen Deutsch of Buffalo Grove who is including a christening gown with its story sewn on the front, to a boat with a book fashioned out of the sail, created by Carole Komarek of Arlington Heights.

Jeanne Kramer of Barrington said the exhibit gave her the chance to merge her favorite techniques together in art forms. Consequently, she started out by painting some birds in watercolor before creating handmade books to fasten them to, and standing them up to look like accordion books.

"I enjoy playing with different things, like sculpture and things that are cutout, that I can use my watercolors with," Kramer said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Books as an Art Form Artists Create Their Versions of Literary Works
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.