Weblogs Offer an Alternative

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

Weblogs Offer an Alternative


Everyday you hear people voicing their opinions on any and every subject imaginable. If you're not interested in what they're saying the usual polite nod comes into play, but there are times when it's beneficial to add your opinion to the discussion of others.

Traditionally this has been cumbersome, as finding an audience with the same interests and views as yourself could be both random and time consuming. Even writing a letter to the editor of your favourite magazine or newspaper, although highly effective when printed, does unfortunately have no guarantee of publication.

The development of Weblogs offers an effective alternative, and allows all individuals the opportunity to add their views, experiences and opinions to a raft of issues. An entire website can solely be set-up as a Weblog, but usually they are set-up as a feature on an existing site.

Weblogs allow individuals to publish their own content in a chronological order alongside entries made by other users.

For example, we have a Weblog on the OpportunityWales website which encourages content from users on all areas of e-commerce. This is an excellent way for people anywhere in the world, with an interest in e-commerce, to communicate, share views and voice opinions with an audience.

The social benefits of Weblogs are significant as individuals are able to interact by discussing and commenting on shared topics.

The diverse range means that if any issue is of a personal interest or concern to you, its probable that a Weblog exists that would be of interest.

As a working mum I've even found one to replace the traditional mother and baby club! …

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Weblogs Offer an Alternative
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