Harvard Lack of Confidence Vote Countered by Board

Black Issues in Higher Education, April 7, 2005 | Go to article overview

Harvard Lack of Confidence Vote Countered by Board


CAMBRIDGE, MASS.

Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences passed a motion last month saying it lacked confidence in President Lawrence Summers--the first such action in the nearly 400-year history of the university. However, days later, the Harvard Corporation, the university's governing board, came out in support of the president.

"As I said in my recent letter to the Harvard community, the members of the Corporation fully support President Summers in his ongoing efforts to listen thoughtfully to the range of views being expressed by members of the university's faculties, and to work collegially and constructively with them to address the important academic matters facing Harvard," said James Houghton, senior fellow, Harvard Corporation, in a statement.

The arts and sciences faculty is one of 10 that comprise the university. The faculty's 218185 vote supporting the motion--which even supporters had expected to be defeated--was a significant setback to Summers' efforts to rebuild his standing with Harvard's faculty in the wake of an uproar over his comments about women in science at an academic conference in January.

At the very least, the vote seemed likely to prolong the period of divisiveness among faculty and hinder Summers' efforts to return focus to his agenda for remaking the university.

The measure stated simply: "The Faculty lacks confidence in the leadership of Lawrence H. Summers."

The faculty also passed, 253-137, a milder rebuke of Summers' comments and "managerial approach."

"As I said to the faculty, I have tried these last couple months to listen to all that has been said, to learn from it, and to move forward, and that's what I am going to do," Summers said afterward. …

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