Target Sees Red for Drug Bottles

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Target Sees Red for Drug Bottles


Byline: Marguerite Higgins, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Most of Target's 1,330 stores are pitching traditional orange, plastic prescription drug bottles in favor of red ones that open from the bottom.

The new bottles are part of a patient communication program, "Clear Rx," the Minneapolis-based retailer started this month.

Stores nationwide will have the new bottles, which have reformatted labels, behind their pharmacy counters by tomorrow, said spokeswoman Paula Thornton-Greear. They will be featured only at Target stores with pharmacies.

The new bottle design came partly from a poll Target conducted on consumers' understanding of instructions from prescription drug bottles.

The poll found that nearly six out of 10 U.S. adults had taken prescription medication incorrectly. Additionally, the survey found most adults don't read the prescription information sheets that come with drug bottles.

The new bottles have labels on both sides that contain larger fonts and fewer messages than traditional prescription containers.

The company said the new labeling on the bottles will minimize customer confusion on how to take their pills and the common side effects.

"Guests won't have to rotate the bottle around to read important information," Ms. Thornton-Greear said.

She would not say how much the program cost to implement, but said the cost will not affect store prescription drug prices.

On the front of the bottle, the label lists the drug's name and the dosage. Instructions on taking the drug follow along with doctor and pharmacy information on the bottom. …

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