Development Limited at Homestead Preserve

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Development Limited at Homestead Preserve


Byline: Michele Lerner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Homestead, a treasured rural resort since 1766, rests in the Warm Springs Valley of the Allegheny Mountains near the towns of Hot Springs and Warm Springs in southwestern Virginia's Bath County.

The Homestead offers three golf courses, elegant dining, skiing, an equestrian center, a shooting club, a full-service spa and year-round outdoor activities.

Now fans of the resort can purchase vacation homes in the Homestead Preserve, a planned community of 450 homes on 2,300 acres near the resort.

Two years of research on local residential styles by the architectural design firm Urban Design Associates resulted in a "pattern book" that includes four basic home styles: a highlands farmhouse, highlands classical, highlands arts and crafts and English romantic. All are intended to fit in with local residential styles.

The developers of the Homestead Preserve chose to develop only about 3 percent of their original land purchase. They sold some of the land to the Nature Conservancy and put additional land into permanent conservation easements with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation.

The land available in Homestead Preserve could accommodate as many as 1,800 homesites, according to the developers, but they limited the number to 450.

Homestead Preserve Managing Director Charles Adams and partner Dan Killoren, who founded Celebration Associates in 1997, are recognized for their design and development of Celebration, Fla., near Orlando, one of the world's largest planned communities.

Virginia Hot Springs Co., formed by J. Pierpont Morgan in 1892, is an affiliate of Celebration Associates and is working in partnership with Crosland Inc. on the Homestead Preserve project.

Homestead Preserve residents will be able to apply for membership in the Homestead resort.

"Fiber-to-the-home" technology will allow each home to be wired with high-speed Internet access to a community intranet.

The community will include neighborhood gathering areas, swimming pools and playgrounds. The Warm Springs neighborhood community center will be located in a renovated dairy barn complex, a local landmark.

Homesites at the Homestead Preserve range from a half-acre to 10 acres, with an average size of 2 acres to 3 acres. …

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