Unbelievably, Cadillac for 1977 Was Downsized

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 29, 2005 | Go to article overview

Unbelievably, Cadillac for 1977 Was Downsized


Byline: Vern Parker, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The first gasoline crunch came 1973 and, while it appeared that General Motors was doing nothing to address the problem, the 1977 product line proved differently.

In an effort to meet the federally mandated economy and emissions levels for the late 1970s, General Motors shrank all of its cars for 1977.

Cadillacs in 1977, depending on the model, were 8 to 12 inches shorter than the corresponding 1976 model.

They were also 3.5 inches narrower. General Motors lopped off about 950 pounds per Cadillac Sedan deVille.

The turning radius of the Cadillac dropped from 45.1 feet in 1976 to 40.5 feet in 1977.

In spite all the downsizing, the 1977 Sedan deVille was still 18.5 feet long, rode on a 121.5-inch wheelbase and tipped the scales at 4,222 pounds.

Under the hood of the new smaller 1997 Cadillac, beneath a four-barrel Quadrajet carburetor, was a 425-cubic-inch (7.0-liter) V-8 that, thanks to government regulations, produced only a meager 180 horsepower.

None of this downsizing concerned young Dan Ryan. He repeated what he did every autumn in Bay Shore on Long Island when the new cars arrived. With parental permission, he would bicycle to the Cadillac dealership to drool over the latest model and collect whatever automotive literature he could. Even as a boy, he was a Cadillac man.A base price of $10,020 was attached to a crimson 1977 Cadillac Sedan deVille that was nicely fitted out with optional accessories. The history of the car is somewhat vague, but it is believed to be an original upstate New York car.

The second owner acquired the Cadillac in 1986 and kept it 18 years. That's when Mr. Ryan, now manager of government and safety affairs for Mazda North American Operations in Washington, saw the car advertised for sale on the Internet. The description stated that the Cadillac was located near Syracuse, N.Y., and had been driven 79,000 miles. Pictures showed a car that had received excellent care. He couldn't believe that he was bidding on a "sight unseen" automobile. However, that's exactly what he did in October 2004. "The car jumped out at me," Mr. Ryan says. "What could I do? It spoke to me."

He was the high bidder and became the third owner.

A trucking company delivered his prize to his College Park home on a Sunday. It had been transported on a rack above the cab of the truck. When Mr. Ryan first saw his Cadillac, he gave the elevated car a cursory look and declared, "The bottom looks good."

He gave his Cadillac a quick bath and marveled at how nice the car was from the 64 spokes in the wheel covers to the 11 red defogger wires in the rear window. A large backup light is on either side of the license plate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Unbelievably, Cadillac for 1977 Was Downsized
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.