THE LIST: Jansons Returns

The Birmingham Post (England), April 30, 2005 | Go to article overview

THE LIST: Jansons Returns


There was a period when Birmingham music-lovers wondered whether they would ever see Mariss Jansons conducting in the city again, writes Christopher Morley.

Past visits had always drawn huge acclaim, not least a performance in Symphony Hall of Mahler's Symphony No 2 with the Oslo Philharmonic, an orchestra which the Latvian-born conductor had raised to the highest international status. But an increasing workload involving jet-setting around the world as he juggled several orchestras eventually took its toll, and Jansons succumbed to a serious heart condition while still only in his mid-50s. Months of enforced inactivity before he was able at last to return to the podium encouraged him to take stock and prune his engagement diary.

'I have now two orchestras and spend most of my time with them,' he tells me. 'The Orchestra of the Bavarian Radio in Munich and the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam. I regularly conduct the Berlin and Vienna Philharmonics (he will be directing the latter's famous New Year's Day concert in 2006) and if I have any time left, I would love to go to the London Symphony Orchestra, perhaps to some leading American orchestra or do opera.'

This still seems like a heavy workload to me, but Jansons continues: 'Actually I concentrate now more on a limited quantity of orchestras. My health is good, thank God. The problem was when I worked in the US. I suffered from jet lag which of course was difficult. Since I am now only once a year in the US, I have no problems with jet lag and everything is OK. But transatlantic travel too often is difficult.'

Mariss Jansons is the son of the renowned conductor and teacher Arvid Yansons (note the older Russian-to-English transliteration), who was a popular and frequent guest at the HallA Orchestra in Manchester. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

THE LIST: Jansons Returns
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.