Vital: Health: How Food Can Get You in the Mood

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), May 3, 2005 | Go to article overview

Vital: Health: How Food Can Get You in the Mood


Byline: By Brian McIver

IF the old saying is true and you really are what you eat, then it's time to get happy, calm, sexy, perky and energised with your diet. Everyone knows a bit of comfort food or a sweet treat can lift your mood or give you a wee smile - but everything you eat can have a positive or negative effect on your emotions and your happiness, depending on what they are made of.

Scientists have just discovered that eating ice cream isn't just a fun experience for the taste buds, it can also be a chemical boost for your psyche.

Neurologists in London noticed the brains of ice cream eaters showed enlargement and increased activity in pleasure centres such as the orbitofrontal cortex.

It's just one of the foods that can cheer you up, make you more alert and relaxed - but it's important you get the right mix.

Indulging in carbohydrate-rich foods like bread, pasta and potatoes may offer a temporary boost or comfort, but will also lead to an increase in insulin production which brings you right back with a bump shortly after, while higher fibre carbs like brown rice or bread can give you a longer lasting kick.

Here is a guide to the best foods to give you a smile, and more

CHOCOLATE

Every woman's best friend has long been known to have anecdotally proven mood-altering effects, but the science is there to back it up.

It produces pleasure-enhancing endorphins to make you smile, and also contains the phenylethylamine stimulant linked with the emotions produced by lust and love - so it really is as good as sex. And Italian scientists at Milan's San Raffaele Hospital reported women who ate chocolate every day enjoyed a stronger libido than non chocaholics.

While Finnish research claims pregnant chocolate eaters have happier babies. But make sure it's plain or dark, with higher reserves of cocoa

NUTS

If you're eating chocolate ice cream, then top it off with some nuts for the full effect.

They are full of L-arginine, which is a crucial amino acid in the body that works to enhance blood flow to your genitals, making you feel sexy, and they are so effective in that area that they have also been used to treat male erectile dysfunction.

The handy snacks are also good for reducing cholesterol, so it should cheer you up that your health is going to improve, as long as you eat in some kind of moderation of course

FISH

Fish is good for your heartintelligence, and blood pressure, and also for your mood.

Tuna is rich in trace element selenium, which is believed to help psychological balance and functions, so it will help you keep your mood up and avoid depression, while sardines are full of vitamin D which helps lift your spirits.

Oily fish is high on the recommended dietary ingredients list but in terms of smiles, the Omega-3 fats contained in oily fish, like salmon and mackerel, help keep serotonin levels up in the brain, which keeps you pepped up and avoiding depression

ONIONS

If you want to be smelly but happy, then get munching on some onions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Vital: Health: How Food Can Get You in the Mood
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.