Bolton: Now, the Guessing Game

By Hosenball, Mark | Newsweek, May 9, 2005 | Go to article overview

Bolton: Now, the Guessing Game


Hosenball, Mark, Newsweek


Byline: Mark Hosenball

Senate Dems, still trying to quash the U.N. nomination of John Bolton, are investigating more allegations that Bolton sought to intimidate career officials who disagreed with his hard-line views. The latest hot leads surfaced during a Senate staff interview late last week with John Wolf, former head of the State Department's Nonproliferation Bureau, which reports to Bolton. Sources say Wolf told investigators about two cases when Bolton talked of seeking to "discipline" lower-ranking officials who, he allegedly said, were "not diligent." Wolf said he believed Bolton's real grievance was that he had "policy differences" with them. Investigators believe Bolton favored rapid sanctions against WMD proliferators, while his underlings thought countries accused of proliferation should get a chance to clean up first. Bolton supporters insist their man never initiated formal disciplinary action against any career employee. Bolton backers are also hitting back at a senior intel analyst on Latin America who Bolton once asked the CIA to transfer to a new assignment. The analyst, currently serving undercover overseas, was skeptical of intel regarding alleged Cuban germ warfare that Bolton and other hard-liners wanted to publicize. Bolton supporters say he was justifiably critical of the analyst for allegedly paying too much attention to the work of Ana Belen Montes, a top Pentagon intel analyst who in 2002 was jailed as a Cuban spy. …

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