Diabetes: Food for Thought: Take Steps to Protect Your Health with a Healthy Dose of Exercise and Award-Winning Recipes

The Saturday Evening Post, May-June 2005 | Go to article overview

Diabetes: Food for Thought: Take Steps to Protect Your Health with a Healthy Dose of Exercise and Award-Winning Recipes


With over 13 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes and another 16 million at high risk, physicians, health advocates, and government leaders are scrambling to find solutions to the expanding problem.

In study after study, the twin pillars of diet and exercise continue to emerge as the building blocks of any successful program to prevent or reduce the complications of type 2 diabetes. For adults over 60 at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, losing even a small amount of weight and increasing one's physical activity can add up to big rewards in the battle against the disease.

Unlocking the secret to more healthful meals starts by choosing the right foods in the right combinations, transforming an otherwise bland diet into scrumptious menus the entire family will enjoy.

But don't take our word for it. Try the following omega-3-rich fish and low-fat veggie recipes that Post editors have selected from Cooking and Baking for Diabetics by Dr. Hans Hauner and Friedrich Bohlmann. This new educational health and recipe resource boasts over 200 recipes that will allow you to discover how diverse and sensational today's diabetic diet can be.

BAKED SALMON WITH CUCUMBER
SALAD

(Makes 2 servings)

1/2 onion
4-5 sprigs fresh dill
2 slices salmon, about 31/2 oz. each
Salt
2 teaspoons oil, divided
2 teaspoons lemon juice
Finely grated zest of I/2 lemon
1 tablespoon fruit vinegar
1/2 teaspoon liquid honey
1/2 teaspoon medium mustard
Freshly ground pepper
Liquid sweetener
1/2 English cucumber

Preheat oven to 350[degrees] F. Slice onion
and remove stems of dill. Brush bottom
of ovenproof dish with 1 teaspoon
oil. Spread onion in bottom and dill
stems over top.

Season salmon with salt on both
sides, lay it on over the dill stems and
sprinkle with lemon juice. Top with
lemon zest. Cover dish with aluminum
foil and bake 15 minutes. Remove foil,
turn off oven, and leave dish in oven 5
more minutes.

Finely slice fronds of dill; peel and
dice cucumber. Combine vinegar,
remaining teaspoon oil, honey and
mustard in small bowl. Season with 2
pinches salt, a little pepper, and dash
of liquid sweetener. Toss with dill and
cucumber. Arrange salmon and cucumber
salad on two plates, decorate
with twist of lemon peel, if desired,
and serve with potatoes.

Per Serving:

Calories: 267         Fat: 18 gm
Carbohydrate: 4 gm    Protein: 23 gm

GRILLED RED BREAM OR RED
SNAPPER WITH TARRAGON

(Makes 2 servings)

2 small dressed red bream or red
  snapper, about 10 oz. each
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons lime juice
Fresh tarragon or basil leaves
1 shallot
1 tablespoon olive oil

Light or preheat barbecue, indoor grill,
or oven broiler. Using sharp knife,
make 3 or 4 incisions at angle on both
sides of each fish. Season with salt and
pepper; sprinkle with lime juice.

Slice shallot and place 1/2 of the slices
and a little tarragon inside each fish.

Brush fish lightly with oil on both
sides. Lightly oil grill or broiling pan.
Cook on medium heat for 5 minutes
on each side.

Per Serving:

Calories: 248
Carbohydrate: 1 gm
Fat: 12 gm
Protein: 33 gm

TIPS: Baked potatoes and whole-grain
bread go equally well with this dish.
You can also serve a light vegetable
salad for a well-balanced meal.

Red bream is ideal for barbecuing,
but it shouldn't weigh more than 14
ounces. You can substitute the slightly
more expensive yellow bream, also sold
as dorado.

OVEN-BAKED FILLETS WITH
VEGETABLES

(Makes 2 servings)

14 ounces rosefish, red snapper or
  ocean perch fillets
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons flour
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 small eggplant
2 red peppers
1 small tomato
1 small zucchini (courgette)
3 sprigs fresh basil
3 sprigs fresh parsley
2-3 tablespoons fresh bread crumbs
Fresh basil leaves

Sprinkle fish with lemon juice, then
season with salt and pepper. Dip in
flour and shake off any excess.

Chop eggplant and slice red peppers,
tomato and zucchini. Finely chop
basil and parsley. … 

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