Sixth-Graders Gone Fishing for a Lesson; Shad Restocking Project Teaches Ecology, History on Rappahannock

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 6, 2005 | Go to article overview

Sixth-Graders Gone Fishing for a Lesson; Shad Restocking Project Teaches Ecology, History on Rappahannock


Byline: Gary Emerling, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

ON THE BANKS OF THE RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER - Students from Holy Cross Academy of Fredericksburg, Va., got a lesson about a different type of school here yesterday.

More than 40 sixth-graders helped state and federal officials stock about 400,000 American shad fry fish into the largest open riverway on the East Coast.

The event was a joint effort by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries to bolster the population of what was once the most plentiful fish in the area.

It also gave the students from Holy Cross a chance to learn about the environment - and escape the confines of the classroom for a day.

"We learned more about the shad and you get to come down to the river," said Claire Winkler, 12, as she stood near a truck that held thousands of the fish in a large container.

Three students at a time carried buckets containing the tiny fry to the river's banks at the Kelly's Ford landing and slowly poured the fish into the water. Later, officials funneled the rest of the fry through a hose into the river.

Officials hope the anadromous fish - which spend their adult lives in the ocean but return to freshwater to spawn - will spend the summer in the Fredericksburg area before migrating to the Atlantic Ocean in October.

The shad are expected to return to the river three to five years later to spawn, boosting the population of what was the most important fish species in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries from Colonial times until the 1930s.

"Economically, it was the most important fin fish species," said Michael C. Odom, a fishery biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Service. "There's a commercial perspective there, recreational value and an ecological value - they were once a critical link between ocean and freshwater [systems]."

Overfishing and the loss of spawning habitat contributed to the crash in American shad populations in the area. By 1980, Maryland closed all shad fisheries in the state. Virginia did the same in 1994.

Now, a Baywide moratorium on harvesting American shad, combined with stocking efforts that put nearly 5 million of the fish in the Rappahannock and the Hazel River - near Rixeyville, Va. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sixth-Graders Gone Fishing for a Lesson; Shad Restocking Project Teaches Ecology, History on Rappahannock
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.