'Pinoy He He Henyos'

Manila Bulletin, May 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

'Pinoy He He Henyos'


Heres another "Laban O Bawi" classic which happened on April 21 with Vic Sotto and yours truly as hosts. It was during the one-on-one elimination round to determine the winner to play the jackpot. Boy versus girl.

HOST: Anong famous landmark ang matatagpuan sa may Hudson River sa New York? Three words ito. (The male contestant pressed first.) Yes?

BOY: Empire State Building!

Host: Three words yun, but that is not the correct answer. (The girl pressed the buzzer.) Yes, darling?

GIRL: White Westing House! (The studio was in pandemonium.) Ay, White House pala!

(Of course, the correct answer was Statue Of Liberty, but the hosts were having so much fun so they played along.)

HOST: O, White House two words lang we need three words.

GIRL: Ay, White Westing House nga!

Thats a clear case of "punchline na, pi-nanchline pa!" A double punch; doble acheche.

But the day before that, something very funny happened also in the jackpot portion of "Eat Bulagas" segment called "Pinoy Henyo." For those who are not familiar, this is how its played: There are two members of the winning team. One is to guess the mystery word placed directly above his head. The other team member is seated directly in front of the guesser and he/she is allowed only to say "yes" or "no" or "maybe"/"pwede to the questions of the guesser. They are given 90 seconds to come up with the mystery word. If they get it, they win R100,000.

The mystery word that day was "tawilis" and that, of course, is a kind of fish. Then, the questioning started. After about 15 seconds, they got on the right track when the guesser asked "ito bay pandagat? …

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