Creationism and Darwinism

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 10, 2005 | Go to article overview

Creationism and Darwinism


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Thursday's editorial "Debating Darwinism" was presented as a thoughtful observation of the debate over state science standards and the teaching of Darwinism in Kansas public schools. However, as a critical thinker, observer and modest theoretical as well as practicing participant in American and international science, I perceive the editorial's inherent skew toward creationism.

Frankly, your writer in his or her analysis does not understand - or chooses to ignore - the nature of scientific debate. Scientists are some of the most skeptical and self-critical practitioners in any discipline. We routinely scour our paradigms, practice and consciences for subjectivity. Thus, our system of cross-reference, peer-review and reproducible results structures the often cautious nature of inquiry. By contrast, for substantiation of the oppositional viewpoint, your author quotes a "leading Darwinian skeptic" who works for a distinctly subjective creationist organization, the Discovery Institute.

These guys and your author have committed the logical fallacy of comparing empirical study with an ideology, the latter being a social construct. There is thus no real "debate" about evolution, only one regarding the finer points of the mechanism of natural selection. To be fair, your author did address this latter point. The real debate is what will be presented in the public schools. Several logical inconsistencies are involved, thus the boycott of the current "show" by legitimate practitioners.

You do a disservice to your readership in condoning this misrepresentation of science and its protocol. Of course, it's your business if you choose to endorse tacitly or otherwise a belief system (or mythology, if you will; all cultures have origin myths) with a clear political and economic agenda. Access to economic resources and resultant anticipated reproductive fitness are, after all, the bases for much group membership in ideological systems. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Creationism and Darwinism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.