Wilde Thing; He's the New Lusty Lord of Period Drama - with the Floppy-Haired Looks of Hugh Grant and the Upper-Crust Vowels of Edward Fox. as He Prepares to Play a Lovelorn King, STEPHEN CAMPBELL MOORE Tells MOIRA PETTY Why He Just Can't Help Being Posh

Daily Mail (London), May 14, 2005 | Go to article overview

Wilde Thing; He's the New Lusty Lord of Period Drama - with the Floppy-Haired Looks of Hugh Grant and the Upper-Crust Vowels of Edward Fox. as He Prepares to Play a Lovelorn King, STEPHEN CAMPBELL MOORE Tells MOIRA PETTY Why He Just Can't Help Being Posh


Byline: MOIRA PETTY

The setting is Italy's glorious Amalfi coast; the period, 1930s.

Snaking along the road comes a sleek Alfa Romeo, which is brought to a sudden, juddering halt by its driver, Lord Darlington, the most dashing - and dangerous - of playboy peers. He has another man's wife in his sights, but Stephen Campbell Moore, the actor portraying the lusty lord in the new romantic comedy film, A Good Woman, had eyes only for the vintage 70-year-old car.

'They didn't want me to drive it, as there are only two left in the world,' he says.

'To start with, there were three guys with a rope pulling the car as I sat in it. Director Mike Barker said, "It doesn't look as if you're driving it."

I said, "That's because I'm not." I took it down a mountain on a practice run, and you could feel the vibrations as you drove. Then we filmed the scene where I had to slide into a driveway. There was a wall nearby and the guy responsible for taking care of the car looked as if his life was flashing before him.' If Stephen, 27, sounds as excited as Mr Toad taking to the open road for the first time, he has good reason. In the sumptuous new film, an adaptation of Oscar Wilde's late Victorian comedy of manners, Lady Windermere's Fan, he stars opposite Helen Hunt and Scarlett Johansson. And soon, he and Joely Richardson will be seen on TV in the lead roles in Wallis & Edward, about the 1936 abdication crisis and the love affair that prompted it.

Stephen's lean, intelligent face and sensitive performance is already familiar to audiences from the 2003 movie Bright Young Things, directed by Stephen Fry, and adapted from Evelyn Waugh's novel Vile Bodies. All three films are set in the 1930s and, with each succeeding role, Stephen has risen up the social ladder, culminating in his portrayal of King Edward VIII.

Far from being worried about typecasting, Stephen is ecstatic at landing such high profile parts. Educated at public school in Hertfordshire, he says, 'I speak with an upper-class accent, so the chances are that I will be cast as an aristocrat and in period pieces. I live in New York at the moment, and I'm a blank page there. I've just been in Los Angeles, meeting producers. I'm not trying to make it huge in Hollywood, but I'm not snobbish. If I get a blockbuster film, great. They're often good.' He has made New York's East Village his base as his Italian girlfriend Ra, a video artist, has a fellowship at Columbia University. When they met in Rome, almost eight years ago, it was, confesses Stephen, 'love at first sight', although neither could speak the other's language. Within a few months, Ra had followed Stephen to London, where he was a drama student at the Guildhall; now he has returned the compliment. 'Most of my work has been in Europe, so I have to make sure I keep earning enough to afford all the travel from New York.' His career ascent has been steady, with roles for the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre, and on television in Byron and in the acclaimed Trollope adaptation, He Knew He Was Right. In A Good Woman, Stephen certainly looks the part, swanning about on his yacht and cultivating young American beauty Meg Windermere (Scarlett Johansson), while her husband (Mark Umbers) strikes up a suspicious relationship with Helen Hunt's American femme fatale, chased out of the U.S.

by a cabal of her lovers' wives. Later - as readers familiar with Oscar Wilde's original will know - there is a surprising revelation.

Translating the play from the society drawing rooms of England in 1892 to the jet-set's summer retreat in the 1930s works surprisingly well. The locations are breathtaking; the costumes and other period details visually enchanting. 'I like the fact that the film's not pretentious, but slightly irreverent.' It is Stephen who delivers one of Wilde's most famous lines, 'We're all lying in the gutter, but some of us are staring at the stars. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wilde Thing; He's the New Lusty Lord of Period Drama - with the Floppy-Haired Looks of Hugh Grant and the Upper-Crust Vowels of Edward Fox. as He Prepares to Play a Lovelorn King, STEPHEN CAMPBELL MOORE Tells MOIRA PETTY Why He Just Can't Help Being Posh
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.