Editorial

By Johnson, Peggy | Library Resources & Technical Services, April 2005 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Johnson, Peggy, Library Resources & Technical Services


The purpose of LRTS is to "support the theoretical, intellectual, practical, and scholarly aspects of the profession of collection management and development, acquisitions, cataloging and classification, preservation and reformatting, and serials, by publishing articles (subject to double-blind peer review) and book reviews, and editorials and correspondence in response to the same." (1) To that end, LRTS aims to publish papers that represent all activities for which ALCTS is responsible. We seek to give particular attention to those areas that the membership tells us are of greatest interest. This issue is representative of the ALCTS membership, with papers on classification, subject analysis, preservation, acquisitions, and serials. I am especially excited to publish "The Ethics of Republishing: A Case Study of Emerald/MCB University Press Journals," by Phil Davis. This study has already gained a great deal of attention in our profession following Phil's initial presentation of his research in November 2004. Papers such as these, and the others in this issue, are what make LRTS a stellar journal.

The prominence of LRTS has been confirmed in a recent study by Thomas Nisonger and Charles Davis of Indiana University presented in October 2004 at the National Library Research Seminar III, Kansas City. (2) Nisonger and Davis gathered ratings from the deans and directors of ALA-accredited MLS degree programs in North America, who ranked the importance and prestige of more than seventy library and information science refereed research journals in supporting promotion and tenure decisions. …

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