FLAMES OF HATE; on the Streets of London, Muslims Burn Effigy of Blair and US Flags in Demo over Koran 'Abuse'

The Evening Standard (London, England), May 20, 2005 | Go to article overview

FLAMES OF HATE; on the Streets of London, Muslims Burn Effigy of Blair and US Flags in Demo over Koran 'Abuse'


Byline: LUKE DAVID

MUSLIM protesters today called for the bombing of New York in a demonstration outside the US embassy in London.

There were threats of "another 9/11" from militants angry at reports of the desecration of the Koran by US troops in Iraq.

Some among the crowd burned an effigy of Tony Blair on a crucifix and then set fire to a Union Flag and a Stars and Stripes.

Led by a man on a megaphone, they chanted, "USA watch your back, Osama is coming back" and "kill, kill USA, kill, kill George Bush". A small detail of police watched as they shouted: "Bomb, bomb New York" and "George Bush, you will pay, with your blood, with your head".

Demonstrators in Grosvenor Square, some with their faces covered with scarves, waved placards which included the message: "Desecrate today and see another 9/11 tomorrow."

The crowd was expected to grow during the afternoon.

The protest was organised by groups including the Muslim Council for Britain and the Muslim Parliamentary Association of the UK. Their protest follows-fury in the Islamic world over the claims in a Newsweek magazine that US soldiers at Guantanamo Bay had abused the Koran. …

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FLAMES OF HATE; on the Streets of London, Muslims Burn Effigy of Blair and US Flags in Demo over Koran 'Abuse'
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