Computer Hypertextual "Uncovering" in Art Education

By Taylor, Pamela G.; Carpenter, B. Stephen, II | Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, Spring 2005 | Go to article overview

Computer Hypertextual "Uncovering" in Art Education


Taylor, Pamela G., Carpenter, B. Stephen, II, Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia


Teaching for understanding is a traditional goal in education that is enhanced through what curriculum theorists Wiggins and McTighe (1998) called "uncovering." In this article the authors describe the ways that interactive computer technology--hypertext--facilitates this act of "uncovering" as students try out ideas, formulate questions, and rethink previous knowledge to reveal personal connections and associations among complex, abstract, and counterintuitive ideas. Using examples from high school and university graduate and undergraduate art education classes, the authors reveal ways that hypertextual uncovering transforms the traditional "hands-on" practice of teaching and learning in art to a "minds-on" approach that involves explanation, interpretation, application, perspective, empathy, and self-knowledge.

**********

"Understanding" through such hands-on activities as artmaking and critique has been a traditional goal in art education for many years. Teachers demonstrate and teach artmaking techniques or media following a discussion of a work of art and the artist responsible for its creation. Students then try out this newly acquired information by making something with their hands and the materials available to them. Aesthetics, criticism, and art history--the other aspects of the art world--are taught through research and course readings that are then discussed and "tried-out" through practical "hands-on" activities. Such activities may include formal class discussion, critique, and individual and group work. The goal of these "hands-on" activities is student understanding attained through practical application. The hope is that as students practically apply new knowledge and information they will try out possible solutions, formulate questions, and rethink previous knowledge to reveal personal connections and associations among complex, abstract, and counterintuitive ideas. Assessing, evaluating, and/or charting this process is a constant and continual challenge for art educators. Our students learn in idiosyncratic ways and no matter how many choices of hands-on activities are presented or are available in the classroom, not everyone will respond or understand in authentic ways. Not everyone will make personal connections and associations through hands-on projects. And even if they do, how do we know? How do our students know? How can we more directly involve our students in understanding beyond the art curriculum that which they begin to know in the art classroom?

UNCOVERING IN ART EDUCATION

Education curriculum theorists Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe (1998) pointed to the aforementioned understanding process as "uncovering." It could be said that such uncovering is at the heart of the study and making of art. Aesthetician Arthur Danto (1992) looked at art history as a series of erasures of the rules of what could be art, rather than viewing the field as a series of advances or responses to past movements. "And that means that to understand [a work of art] requires reconstruction of the historical and critical perception which motivated it" (p. 47). The context in which the art was made and the context in which we view it affect our artistic interpretation. Such contextual recognition requires us to move past superficial and/or first impressions toward a more sophisticated process of research and thinking through active uncovering.

The idea of uncovering also refers to archeology and the notion that meaning is hidden, buried, and overlooked. That is, researchers and critics uncover meaning embedded within artifacts, material and visual culture, and works of art. Further, some theorists use the metaphor of "layers of meaning," to describe the relative complexity and density of information related to a particular work of art. Artists also consider layered meaning and the act of uncovering content in and through the works of art they produce. For example, contemporary artist Flo Oy Wong's The Baby Jack Rice Story (1993-1996) documents the story of her husband, Ed Wong, and his childhood experiences living and growing up in the segregated South. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Computer Hypertextual "Uncovering" in Art Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.