Not Again

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 30, 2005 | Go to article overview

Not Again


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Not again

That was New Republic senior editor Andrew Sullivan ruining an otherwise delightful Sunday by warning us yesterday to prepare for "Abu Ghraib II."

"The ACLU just won a suit to get the photographs we have not yet seen. June 30th, they get released - horrifying beyond belief," he informed viewers of "The Chris Matthews Show."

"More dog collars, more piling up?" Chris Matthews pressed.

"No. Rapes," Mr. Sullivan said.

"On camera?" asked the host.

"On camera," the editor said.

Worth pondering

"Too often in America we have attempted to do justice without regard for righteousness, or we have regarded righteousness as an end in itself, without enough regard for those who suffer injustice as a result."

Such was the commencement counsel of Sen. Sam Brownback, Kansas Republican, earlier this month, explaining to graduates of Christendom College in Front Royal, Va., that "those on the receiving end of injustice often become deeply cynical, wounded and ... eventually lash out in anger at a system they have come to regard as cruelly set against them."

"Their despair and alienation from society, and the social unrest that results, is our punishment."

'Nincompoops'

We'd written last week that six congressmen - five Democrats and one independent - have organized the Future of American Media Caucus.

Rep. Bernard Sanders, Vermont independent and a co-chairman of the group, complains that Americans have "fewer programming choices and a rapidly dwindling supply of independent news and information sources," and the caucus "is an important step in the fight to maintain local perspectives and diversity of opinion in the media."

Among the dozens of Inside the Beltway readers to react to this latest congressional caucus is Dennis Campbell.

"I literally gasped," he writes. "Do these people have anything actually working inside their heads? We have more choices and news sources now than in any time in history.

"I guess the fact that conservatives now have a way to get their message out is just too much for these nincompoops to bear."

Where's my whites?

"Setting what has to be some kind of endurance record, the president spent two hours standing beneath a full sun in a black suit, shaking hands with more than 900 Naval Academy graduates as they crossed the stage to receive their diplomas. …

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