Pope John Paul II: 1920-2005

By Dix, Tara K. | U.S. Catholic, June 2005 | Go to article overview

Pope John Paul II: 1920-2005


Dix, Tara K., U.S. Catholic


Clockwise from left:

John Paul II visits Mother Teresa in Calcutta, 1986.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In Rome, just days after his election as pope, 1978.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Forgiving his would-be assassin, Mehmet Ali Agca, who shot the pope in 1981.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Embracing Monik, 3, in Madagascar, 1989.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Background: Celebrating Mass in Krakow, Poland, 2002.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Clockwise from left:

Karol Jozef Wojtyla poses on his First Communion Day, c. 1928. Greeting Chicagoans on his first U.S. visit as pope, 1979.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Meeting President Ronald and Nancy Reagan in Fairbanks, Alaska, 1984.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Visiting Native Americas in Yellowknife, Canada, 1984,

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Reeling from a bullet in the abdomen fired by Mehmet Ali Agca, May 13, 1981. A six-hour surgery repaired the damage.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

As a young seminarian (undated).

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Clockwise from left:

The pope is received by President Jimmy Carter in 1979, marking the first time any pope visited the White House.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Addressing the faithful in an undated photo.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

At a snowy Mass in Sarajevo, 1997.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

At World Youth Day in Denver, 1993.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Waving to well-wishers from his Popemobile in Bydgoszcz, Poland, 1999.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A 1995 visit to Baltimore included this moment with a young girl.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Taking some time to walk and pray in the woods during his 1984 visit to Canada.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Clockwise from below:

Visiting a family in M'Banza-Congo, Angola, 1992.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Praying at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem during his Jubilee Year pilgrimage, 2000.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Blessing the people in St. Peter's Square during his Urbi et Orbi message, Christmas, 2004.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Archbishop Piero Marini, right, kneels by the coffin of Pope John Paul II during the funeral in St. Peter's Square on April 8, 2005.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Mourners huddle in sleeping bags under the colonnades of St. Peter's Square on the eve of the funeral.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"God of our fathers, you chose Abraham and his descendants to bring your name to the Nations: We are deeply saddened by the behavior of those who in the course of history have caused these children of yours to suffer, and, asking your forgiveness, we wish to commit ourselves to genuine brotherhood with the people of the Covenant."

--Message left by John Paul II at the Wailing Wall, Jerusalem, March 26, 2000

A Final Blessing

"I leave you now with this prayer: that the Lord Jesus will reveal himself to each one of you, that he will give you the strength to go out and profess that you are Christian, that he will show you that he alone can fill your hearts.

"Accept his freedom and embrace his truth, and be messengers of the certainty that you have been truly liberated through the death and Resurrection of the Lord Jesus.

"This will be the new experience, the powerful experience, that will generate, through you, a more just society and a better world. God bless you, and may the joy of Jesus be always with you. Amen."

May 18, 1920: Karol Jozef Wojtyla is born in Wadowice, Poland.

1929: His mother, Emilia, dies.

1932: His brother, Edmund, dies of scarlet fever.

1937: Karol and his father move to Krakow. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pope John Paul II: 1920-2005
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.