Tests: Would You Pass the Test

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 4, 2005 | Go to article overview

Tests: Would You Pass the Test


Byline: By MICHELLE RUSHTON

EMPLOYERS are increasingly relying on tests to select new staff. While the formal interview remains a key feature of the assessment process, candidates need to be prepared for any number of different tests an employer might arrange.

Candidates are likely to be faced by psychometric or aptitude tests. These try to find out if a candidate has the necessary abilities and personal qualities for the job. Sometimes they involve quite sophisticated computer exercises.

Testing techniques used could be multiple choice exams, written or computer-based, role play and group exercises, managing a pretend in-tray, an informal tour of the workplace or even taking dinner with the staff you hope to work with.

Recruitment consultancy Morgan Ryder Associates, based in Liverpool, advises and helps employers to set such tests and works closely with candidates.

'We try to take the mystique out of employment tests by explaining to candidates what they are likely to face,' said Peter Ross, joint managing director of the consultancy.

Peter believes good preparation is vital. 'We keep a range of sample multiple choice tests candidates can practise on, and we have plenty of experience of other tests, including group exercises and role play,' he explained.

Apart from being prepared before you take any test, Peter suggests it is good to Improve your understanding of the nature of tests n Learn about the most common types n Appreciate why employers use tests - for example, helpful as CVs are, they only record past achievements and not potential, whereas tests can show and reveal potential Appreciate how tests are interpreted and marked n Understand what to do if you fail Said Peter: 'It is always wise to find out exactly what you will be facing before the interview day.

'Be prepared for every type of question, but do expect the unexpected, and watch out particularly for those seemingly less formal tests, such as workplace tours. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Tests: Would You Pass the Test
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.