New York City: The World Is Here

Manila Bulletin, June 5, 2005 | Go to article overview

New York City: The World Is Here


Byline: CORNELIO R. DE GUZMAN

NEW YORK CITY As your huge Northwest Airlines jet reduces its speed to prepare for landing at the La Guardia airport, you peer excitedly through the window at New York City spread below.

You could see clearly tall buildings with gleaming glass walls reach upwards like gigantic stone and steel fingers. You see rivers too that twist around and through the city.

Looking down again, you could marvel under your feet a city of islands and islets that are all linked together by great bridges. Farther away from the city harbor is an islet called Liberty where the famous Statue of Liberty, worlds largest statue, is located at the nearby Ellis Island which was the immigration station during the bygone years through which millions of immigrants entered the United States.

You are among those millions of visitors who arrived in the city by plane either through the La Guardia airport, for your domestic flight, or John F. Kennedy airport for your international flight. Both airports are among the worlds busiest.

But there are two more ways to approach New York City. By water through great ocean liners and other types of boat that unload passengers at the New York Harbor; and by land where millions also of people arrive in buses and cars, which stream over highways, through tunnels, and across bridges to be swallowed up in the narrow ravines that lie between rows of skyscrapers

Railroad trains streak across the country to plunge under rivers and emerge at last to unload passengers into the domed vastness of the citys railroad terminals.

Regardless of how a visitor reaches New York or what he has heard about the city, the newcomer is overwhelmed by the citys size, the drove of its people, the endless streams of traffic, the steel and glass towers and crowd in every side.

New York City is made up of five sections called borroughs: the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Richmond. Only the Bronx is on the mainland. Brooklyn and Queens are part of Long Island. Manhattan is an island borrough and so is Richmond, on Staten Island, where New York throw all its garbage. Governors Island served as an army base for many years. Today it is a United States Coast Guard training center. Welfrare Island, the site of several city hospitals, once housed a city prison. There are many other small islands, such as Randalls Island and Rikers Island, scattered throughout the New York City waters.

New York City is crossed by an interconnecting system of waterways. All the waters that border the city are tidal salt waters. The most important river is the Hudson, which empties into the Atlantic Ocean by way of Upper and Lower New York Bay. The estuary of the Hudson gives the city its famous deepwater harbor. Large ocean-going vessels are able to proceed through the bay and to dock along the citys shoreline.

The Hudson is linked to the East River (actually a strait) by the Harlem River Ship Canal and the Harlem River. The East River connects Long Island Sound with Upper New York Bay.

Each of New York Citys five boroughs is also a county of New York State. In the rest of the state each county contains many villages, towns, and cities. But New York City is so heavily populated that the city has been divided into five different counties. The county and the borough names are the same except for Manhattan (called New York County) and Brooklyn (called Kings County) and Brooklyn (called Kings County). Bridges connect Manhattan, the core of the city, with all the boroughs except Richmond. Ferryboats link Richmond and Manhattan.

Bridges, highways, and tunnels connect the five boroughs and link the giant city to neighboring New Jersey and Connecticut.

No fewer than 61 bridges span the waters around New York. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New York City: The World Is Here
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.