Listen to the New Internet Voice

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), June 15, 2005 | Go to article overview

Listen to the New Internet Voice


Byline: By Christine Holvey

It would be difficult, almost impossible, to imagine life without telephones.

Although they play a crucial role in the world of business, not just for voice calls but also for access to the internet, so familiar is the phone you would be forgiven for thinking that this mature technology was immune from the e-commerce revolution.

But with the advent of Voice Over Internet Protocol there is now a viable and cost effective way that both business and domestic calls can be made. VOIP is a way of transmitting speech across the internet, instead of the usual standard telephone system known as Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN).

Without getting too technical, in a VOIP network, digitalised voice data is compressed and carried in what are called packets over the internet. This compression means that far more voice calls can be carried on the network compared to calls made on the traditional switched network.

By being able to provide voice communication over the internet, there is and will continue to be an increasing number of companies entering the marketplace and offering increasingly competitive communications packages. For customers this increases the number of suppliers they can choose from, which in turn should result in lower prices for communications as the market becomes more competitive.

In comparison to the ordinary telephone system, the distance between you and the person you are talking to doesn't matter, nor does the length of time you talk.

This is particularly the case if you and the person you are calling are using fixed-cost or unmetered internet connections. …

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