RACE RELATIONS; A Positive Focus

The Florida Times Union, May 27, 2005 | Go to article overview

RACE RELATIONS; A Positive Focus


Years ago, the Times-Union brought together community leaders to talk about the challenges facing the city.

Employment, education, housing and transportation were among the subjects. Then it became clear that one thread connected all of the city's major issues -- race.

A similar theme has emerged during the 30 years of reports from Jacksonville Community Council Inc. Affordable housing, adult literacy, teen parents, adult literacy and services for ex-offenders have strong racial components. In its 2002 study on improving race relations, JCCI also addressed this continuing issue of race relations.

Racial issues tend to be addressed only after crises. Thus, the need to take the city's racial temperature in hopes that measurements can lead to improvements.

Now JCCI has released its first race relations progress report. The idea is modeled on its annual Quality of Life survey, which has become such a key part of Jacksonville's cultural life and has been copied nationally.

African-Americans represent a major portion of Duval County -- 28 percent of the population in the 2000 census and 42.6 percent of the public school students. Blacks also have played a major role in Jacksonville's history.

The major concern is that the perception gap between whites and blacks in Jacksonville has widened to its largest point since 1985. While 70 percent of blacks see racism as a problem, only 43 percent of whites do. For instance, 77 percent of blacks say they are treated unfairly while shopping, while only 24 percent of whites think blacks are treated unfairly while shopping.

In nearly every category, there is evidence of progress, yet need for improvement.

For instance, it's good news that black voter registration surged in 2004. In the 2004 elections, only 3 percent of whites and 4 percent of blacks surveyed reported encountering difficulty in voting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

RACE RELATIONS; A Positive Focus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.