Study: Gaps in Hispanic Consumer Behavior: Euro RSCG Pinpoints Key Differences in Mexican, Mexican-American Sectors

By Baar, Aaron | ADWEEK, June 13, 2005 | Go to article overview

Study: Gaps in Hispanic Consumer Behavior: Euro RSCG Pinpoints Key Differences in Mexican, Mexican-American Sectors


Baar, Aaron, ADWEEK


CHICAGO Hispanics are growing faster than any other racial or ethnic group in the country, the U.S. Census Bureau reported last week. Clearly, the U.S. Latino marketing segment isn't cooling down. But when Mexicans move to the U.S., do they take their consumer behavior with them?

A new study from Havas' Euro RSCG sheds light on how Mexicans differ from Mexican Americans--two sectors that in the past were often grouped together in terms of marketing strategies. (The agency has its own Hispanic unit, Euro RSCG Latina, whose strategic planner, Verena Sisa, was one of the study's authors.)

Among the findings: Mexican Americans are more conservative than their counterparts south of the border; they are also less likely to be embrace technology and trust advertising.

The survey, which involved face-to-face interviews with 2,000 Mexicans, found that while Mexicans were more likely to identify themselves as "traditionalists" than Mexican Americans were (39 percent vs. 9 percent), they tended to have less conservative morals. One-third of Mexicans said extramarital affairs are OK as long as no one gets hurt, compared to 9 percent of Mexican Americans. (Euro's Mexican American stats are from its 2004 U.S. Lafino Prosumer Study.)

"There are marketers that we work with who are multinational in scope and would want to know if anything they're doing in Latin America would work in the U.S.," said Monica Gadsby, CEO/managing director of Starcom MediaVest Group's Tapestry in Chicago, the nation's largest buyer of Hispanic media. "[The survey] gives you a starting point."

Dilys Tosteson Garcia, president and CO0 of the Santa Monica, Calif., independent La Agencia de Orci y Asociados, which handles Honda and Verizon, among others, said this finally gave hard data on a growing sector of the marketplace. Marketers "have been using personal and professional experience [as Hispanics] and comparing it to their research on the U. …

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