Anamnesis of Three Powers: Translated from German, This Essay Is the Winner of a Student Competition Run by the University of St. Gallen (a CEMS Member School)

By Muehlberger, Marion | European Business Forum, Summer 2001 | Go to article overview

Anamnesis of Three Powers: Translated from German, This Essay Is the Winner of a Student Competition Run by the University of St. Gallen (a CEMS Member School)


Muehlberger, Marion, European Business Forum


If we want to reduce the complex phenomenon of power to a single equation, 'money equals power' presents itself as a possibility. However, upon more intensive examination, money appears to be more of a purely external measure of the dimensions of a particular form of power. If we define power as the level of possible influence on other people's behaviour; the forming of the environment according to one's own ideas and the superiority achieved over one's peers, then we take into account the relativity of power. After all, power needs obedient people for it to arise, subordinates for it to survive and it will fail because of courageous independent thinking. Power's ability to survive is linked to its subject, which also causes its weakening and its downfall. The search for the case histories of three powers led us into the practice of morbus potentiae, where the following three sets of medical notes can be found on the 20th century desk:

Medical notes 1 for economic forces: patriarchy

Dear colleague,

We are reporting on the examination of our mutual patient Potentia Patris et Viri from 1950 to 2001.

Reason for referral: chronic power atrophy.

Examination: analysis of the historic and current social structure.

Temporary therapy: moving domicile to countries with a stronger Roman Catholic influence.

Long-term therapy: change of habits, self-treatment and aiming for a harmonious symbiosis with female power.

Anamnesis: report on previous history

Social anamnesis: nourished by various intellectual trends, such as Aristotle's flowerpot philosophy and institutions such as the Roman Catholic Church, the power of fathers and men enjoyed perfect health for centuries. Roles were fixed; the pater familias was responsible for the well-being of his family and also kept all the decision-making power for himself. In the world outside the family, men possessed the power to mould economic processes and the institutional framework. The first direct subjects of this power to change were the supposed partners of the family fathers, that is to say housewives and mothers.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Previous illnesses: in a constant process of separation, they found their independence and therefore took the basis of the patriarchs' power away from them. The patient was never able to fully recover from this permanent weakening of its immune system and remained more susceptible to germs from its environment, for example voting rights for women first of all and then, later, the equal rights article in the German constitution.

Family anamnesis: parallel to the decrease in the power of the father and the entry of women into the workplace, the form of relationship represented by the family under one roof has developed into multiple forms of living, stretching from single mothers to childless career-oriented relationships to homosexual families. Institutions, which could be classed as members of the patient's family, and which supported the male-female role images for centuries, are also fighting against power atrophy. The priests, as spokesmen of the Church, are facing empty pews.

Current complaints: women and men have almost total equality in terms of educational opportunities and the chance for self-fulfilment. Chronic infection has also been inflicted on the patient by today's infrastructure, which has allowed many of the previous indispensable tasks of the mother to be separated from her actual person. Creches and day nurseries, microwaves and cable television divide these tasks among themselves and give mothers the time and freedom to enter the world of work. It is not only the subject of power that has changed: the pillars of this power in the environment are also collapsing and allowing new power relationships to emerge.

Results

Laboratory results: endurance test with ECG (ergometrics)

When the power of men and fathers is put on the ergometer, its stamina points to quite considerable endurance up to a relatively high pulse frequency. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Anamnesis of Three Powers: Translated from German, This Essay Is the Winner of a Student Competition Run by the University of St. Gallen (a CEMS Member School)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.