Nonviolent Peace Activism

By Naar-Obed, Michele | Social Justice, Summer 2003 | Go to article overview

Nonviolent Peace Activism


Naar-Obed, Michele, Social Justice


IT IS AN HONOR TO BE PART OF A PANEL WITH SO MANY DEDICATED PEOPLE WORKING for social justice. This panel on "Human Rights Activism and the War on Terrorism" makes it clear that it is very difficult to talk about the war on terrorism without addressing our own government's acts of terrorism. As is well known, at least in our circles, the goal of the United States is to become an empire and superpower. On paper, our country's original ideals sounded good. We were to be a nation grounded in democracy. The people would govern. Capitalism would allow for a healthy, competitive economy and would encourage people to use their talents and resources. Reality, however, has proven differently.

For many decades, the military-industrial complex has been our reality. Some of us have known nothing other than a military economy. Like it or not, war and the preparation for war is our number one business.

Occasionally, the government's true aspirations slip into the mainstream. Perhaps it is done purposefully to see how much they can get away with. For instance, on March 8, 1992, the New York Times ran a front-page story about a 46-page document entitled "The Defense Planning Guide." The first objective was to "prevent the reemergence of a new rival, either on the territory of the former Soviet Union or elsewhere." Together with a number of other objectives, the argument pointed in the direction of building and protecting the U.S. empire. This document is worth looking up simply to see how insane this nation's policies have become. They are at the expense of millions of lives, our environment and natural resources, any kind of nonmilitary economy, our talents, and our youth. With nuclear weapons the cornerstone of militarism, it is even at the expense of the unborn. Moreover, the price tag will be in the trillions of dollars. Already, the U.S. military budget exceeds that of the next eight nations combined.

Enemies are needed to justify such policies and expenditures, and sustaining this plan requires exploiting world resources. From this perspective, every war, declared or undeclared, is an act of aggression and terrorism to attain and sustain our imperial status. Our wars, including the most recent war against terrorism, have never been about defending ourselves or defending weaker or oppressed nations. Who attacked us on September 11, 2001, and who knew of these impending attacks? I am not promoting a conspiracy theory in the sense that heads of different departments sat around a large table to devise a plan that would justify the U.S. goal of world domination. The government does not deserve that much credit. There is, however, much more to the story of September 11 than we have heard, and a very different picture, one that is credible and verifiable, is beginning to emerge.

First, oil resources are of primary national interest and are needed for maintaining our way of life. Since oil is a finite resource, an ongoing search for new sources is necessary. The Caspian Basin is loaded with oil and discussion of building a pipeline across Afghanistan has been underway for years. In 1998, the House of Representatives held hearings on U.S. interests in Central Asia. Unocal Oil's Vice President John Maresca testified about the feasibility of installing such a pipeline. He told the committee that such a project would be impossible until a recognized government was in place in Afghanistan that could gain the confidence of other governments, lenders, and the Unocal Corporation. In other words, they needed a pliable government that would play ball with U.S. corporate interests. Could or would Osama bin Laden or the Taliban regime fit that bill?

Between 1998 and 2001, the FBI and CIA were ordered to back off from their investigations of the bin Laden family, even though Osama was wanted for the 1993 World Trade Center car bombing and the U.S. embassy bombings in Africa. In May 2001, Colin Powell's State Department gave $43 million to the Taliban regime. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Nonviolent Peace Activism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.