Women Are More Sleep-Deprived Than Men

Marketing to Women: Addressing Women and Women's Sensibilities, June 2005 | Go to article overview

Women Are More Sleep-Deprived Than Men


Nearly seven in 10 women (68%) get less than eight hours of sleep per night, according to the Better Sleep Council. Interestingly, female business professionals tend to get more sleep than housewives do. Women who are divorced or separated are more likely than single or married women to get only five hours or less of sleep nightly.

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

Women age 40-60 are particularly sleep-deprived, getting an average of only five hours per night. Nearly three in 10 (27%) Hispanic women, compared with 22% of African American women and 13% of Non-Hispanic White women, say they don't get enough sleep.

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

[GRAPHIC OMITTED]

The three top factors contributing to women's sleep problems are work-or family-related stress, ailments such as allergies or colds, and uncomfortable beds or pillows. Hormonal fluctuations can also be culprits, according to the National Sleep Foundation, which may help explain why women in their 40s and 50s have particular trouble sleeping.

A separate study by the National Sleep Foundation finds that women need more sleep to function well than men do--female respondents say they need an average of 6.8 hours per night, compared with male respondents' average of 6.2.

Women (57%) are more likely than men (51%) to have at least one symptom of insomnia at least a few nights per week. They're also more likely to be sleepy during the daytime at least one day a week (53% versus 47%), to take 30 minutes or more to fall asleep (28% versus 16%), and to consider themselves "evening people" (44% versus 37%). [HUMAN BEHAVIOR, HEALTHCARE/MEDICAL]

MINIMUM HOURS OF SLEEP NEEDED TO FUNCTION WELL, BY GENDER

             Women  Men

Less than 6   17%   26%
        6-7   26%   32%
        7-8   21%   20%
  8 or more   34%   18%

SOURCE: National Sleep Foundation

Note: Table made from bar graph. … 

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women Are More Sleep-Deprived Than Men
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.