Hundreds of Nazi War Criminals May Be Living in Britain

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), June 19, 2005 | Go to article overview

Hundreds of Nazi War Criminals May Be Living in Britain


Byline: MARTIN DELGADO

HUNDREDS of former Nazis involved in the massacre of civilians during the Second World War may be living in Britain, the Government has admitted.

The Home Office said it had identified 'several hundred' former members of the SS Galician Division who may be in the UK.

The Galician Division committed atrocities after the Germans overran south-eastern Poland and western Ukraine. But 7,100 of its members were allowed into Britain in 1947 after spending two years as prisoners of war in Italy.

Few were questioned about their wartime activities and successive British governments refused requests by campaigners to investigate their backgrounds.

Now, however, Ministers have revealed that a new review of cases is under way.

And police have been examining NHS records to find out how many of the suspected war criminals are alive.

Home Office Minister Andy Burnham said in a Commons written answer last week: 'The enquiries into the Galician Division continue. We have identified several hundred individuals in the UK who may still be alive. We are working with other government agencies to explore lines of enquiry to gather any available evidence.' However, the Home Office was unable to say why it had not yet established which suspects were alive, what evidence it held against them or what was being done to bring them to justice. A spokesman said yesterday: 'The Metropolitan Police are taking the lead on this.' Campaigners fear the men will remain free because the Scotland Yard squad set up to pursue war criminals has been starved of resources.

All such investigations used to be handled by the Met's war crimes unit.

But this was disbanded in 1999 and responsibility handed to the Anti-Terrorist Branch, which has since had to devote itself to combating the threat from Al Qaeda-related groups.

'These cases are being pursued in a desultory fashion,' said Labour MP Andrew Dismore, who has given police a list of 75 Auschwitz guards whose whereabouts are unknown. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hundreds of Nazi War Criminals May Be Living in Britain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.