Global-Warming Limits Rejected; Senate Calls for Research on Climate

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

Global-Warming Limits Rejected; Senate Calls for Research on Climate


Byline: Brian DeBose and Bill Sammon, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Senate yesterday rejected far-reaching global-warming mandates to curb carbon-dioxide gas emissions, but acknowledged a link between rising temperatures and so-called greenhouse gases.

In two votes - the 60-38 defeat of a watered-down version of the Kyoto international climate-control treaty and a 54-43 vote in favor of a resolution endorsing scientific explanations of climate change - senators respected the wishes of President Bush to allow for more research but sent a message to him that further inaction would be a mistake.

The two senators who introduced the policy amendment - John McCain, Arizona Republican, and Joe Lieberman, Connecticut Democrat - conceded the vote before it even took place.

"We lost some people, three or four I believe, and I think people in my own party were scared to death of the word 'nuclear,' " Mr. Lieberman said.

The Climate Stewardship Act would have called for emissions trading, allowing coal plants performing below emissions standards to pay a penalty fee or trade with others that are exceeding goals. It would have provided other incentives to develop alternative-energy sources such as solar, nuclear and integrated-coal-combined-cycle technologies or coal recycling, as well as more efficient products and vehicles and alternative fuels.

Opponents said the energy bill already contains such provisions, like a renewable-fuels standard; funding for clean diesel, biodiesel and hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles; and numerous incentives and subsidies without mandating a set emissions standard that is "arbitrary" and "impossible" to attain.Defeat of the stewardship measure reflected the Senate's continued opposition to the international mandates called for under the Kyoto global-warming treaty.

"Kyoto is unachievable; and if you look at the numbers it is impossible; and it is easy to see why the Senate voted against signing the Kyoto Protocol 95-0," said Sen. Pete V. Domenici, New Mexico Republican, referring to the 1997 vote urging President Clinton and future executives not to sign the treaty, because it would be too economically damaging.

"The reason this bill can't be passed is because it can't be implemented; nobody knows how to do it, you can't do it, and nobody who has looked at it has said it can be done," said Mr. Domenici, chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

He said he does accept that "global warming is a problem" and promised to work to find other solutions.

Sen. Daniel K. Akaka, Hawaii Democrat, argued for action on global warming, saying studies prove that "98 percent" of carbon-dioxide emissions are energy-related. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Global-Warming Limits Rejected; Senate Calls for Research on Climate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.