Al and Company

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 23, 2005 | Go to article overview

Al and Company


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Al and company

Former CBS News senior correspondent Bernard Goldberg has an intriguing title for his forthcoming book: "The 100 People Who are Screwing Up America: And Al Franken is #37."

After exposing his old network's political stripes in his best-seller "Bias," Mr. Goldberg will argue in his next book that America has become indiscriminately tolerant of garbage in our culture, which he adds is not the work of some vague, irresistible natural force.

Specific people are to blame, Mr. Goldberg says, and he names names. They are injecting a "slow poison" through America's veins, he explains, turning the country into a selfish and cynical place, a less decent and civil place, eroding its very ethical and moral underpinnings.

And who, besides #37, are the culprits?

He cites pinstripe crooks and intellectual thugs, Hollywood loudmouths and American jackals. He then presents the dirty 100.

Where it stands

A conservative who's who in Washington - David Keene, Becky Norton Dunlop, Morton Blackwell, Grover Norquist, Ron Robinson and Tony Perkins - huddled this week with Sen. Richard M. Burr, North Carolina Republican, and the family and office alumni of Jesse Helms, to plan what one dubbed a "long-overdue Washington tribute" to the senator, who retired in 2002.

It was decided that the gala, benefiting the Jesse Helms Center Foundation, will take place Sept. 20 at the Marriott Crystal Gateway. Mr. Burr and North Carolina Republican Sen. Elizabeth Dole will be co-chairmen for the event, which is timed to coincide with the release of Mr. Helms' long-anticipated memoir, "Here's Where I Stand."

"This is going to be huge," one attendee says. "I think a lot of folks - and not just conservatives - will really look forward to this opportunity to properly honor Senator Helms and his rich legacy here in Washington. The fact that we're able to do it to coincide with the release of his memoir is just icing on the cake."

Calling on Rove

Who better than Karl Rove's former team of campaign strategists to help Ed Cox, the 58-year-old lawyer and son-in-law of former President Richard Nixon, defeat New York Sen. …

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