Maker of 'Living Bible' Dies at 88 Publisher Aimed for Easy

By Dibble, Susan | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), June 12, 2005 | Go to article overview

Maker of 'Living Bible' Dies at 88 Publisher Aimed for Easy


Dibble, Susan, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Susan Dibble Daily Herald Staff Writer

Kenneth Taylor, whose creation of "The Living Bible" in conversational language made the holy text accessible to millions around the world and was the cornerstone of a Christian publishing empire, died Friday in his Wheaton home.

Taylor, 88, had been in declining health for some time but remained actively involved with Tyndale House Publishers, the Christian publishing firm he started from his home more than 40 years ago and which grew to one of the most prominent in the world.

As recently as May 9, Taylor came into the firm's Carol Stream office to celebrate his 88th birthday with staff, said Tyndale corporate publicist Mavis Sanders.

More recently, Tyndale has been known for putting out the wildly popular "Left Behind" series.

But Taylor, who was Tyndale's president from 1962 to 1984 and then chairman of board until his death, was best known for his work in making the Bible more understandable.

Born in 1917, in Portland, Ore., Taylor and his wife, Margaret, started Tyndale after he was unable to find a publisher for his Biblical paraphrasing.

The father of 10, Taylor began putting the Bible into conversational English in the 1950s after he found that his children had difficulty understanding the traditional King James version.

After finishing his paraphrasing of the New Testament epistles, which he called "Living Letters," he self-published 2,000 copies and kept working on other portions of Scripture.

Acceptance was slow at first, until evangelist Billy Graham recommended the use of "Living Letters" in one of his TV campaigns, Sanders said.

Graham and Taylor maintained contact over the years.

"Ken Taylor helped revolutionize the reading of the Bible by his paraphrase editions. Millions of people have benefited from his vision and work," Graham said in a prepared statement. "Ken was a wonderful friend, and I loved him in Christ with all my heart."

By the time Taylor released the complete "Living Bible" in 1971, he received widespread publicity from the secular as well as the Christian press.

Virginia Muir of Carol Stream, a family friend who helped Taylor launch Tyndale House, said "The Living Bible" broke new ground.

"It expressed thought-by-thought rather than word-for-word translation," she said.

The new approach had its critics, but Taylor didn't let that stop him, said John Gross, co-founder of John's Christian Stores in Carol Stream, Naperville and Lake Zurich.

"Some people thought as a paraphrase, it was a little bit too imprecise," Gross said. "(But) there was such a huge positive response on the other hand. That's what he looked at."

"The Living Bible" was the nation's best-selling book in the United States for 1972 and 1973, and has now sold more than 40 million copies.

In 1996, Tyndale House published a new version of "The Living Bible" that was a translation from ancient Greek and Hebrew manuscripts, rather than a paraphrase. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Maker of 'Living Bible' Dies at 88 Publisher Aimed for Easy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.