Yellow Fever: The Global Situation

Bulletin of the World Health Organization, September-October 1992 | Go to article overview

Yellow Fever: The Global Situation


Despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine against yellow fever, the disease has tragically continued to infect and kill thousands of unimmunized people every year. In particular, 1988-90 was an extraordinarily active period for yellow fever, and the global total of 8685 cases and 2643 deaths for these 3 years represents the greatest respective numbers reported to WHO since 1948. The true picture is certainly worse than this, however, since globally each year an estimated 200 000 cases occur, with approximately 30 000 deaths. The disease is endemic only in certain countries in Africa and South America.

In Africa yellow fever periodically explodes out of its endemic cycle to infect large numbers of persons; case fatality rates are high (20-80%) and children are predominantly affected. A total of 33 countries are at risk of the disease in Africa. Over the period 1988-90 the number of cases reported in Africa was 8133, with 2194 deaths. The majority of cases were in Nigeria, but some were also reported from Angola, Cameroon, and Niger.

In contrast to the situation in Africa, in South America yellow fever is predominantly a disease of adult forest workers. All reported cases have occurred in persons infected through contact with the forest cycle. Over the period 1988-90 most of the 552 cases of the disease and 449 deaths were reported from Bolivia and Peru; the remaining cases were reported from Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and French Guiana.

Control strategies

Live, attenuated 17D yellow fever vaccine is effective, producing seroconversion rates of 95%. A long history of use of yellow fever vaccine has demonstrated that it is extremely safe, and only 18 cases of encephalitis have been temporally associated with administration of over 200 million doses of the live 17D vaccine strain since 1945. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Yellow Fever: The Global Situation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.