Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1995-2002

By Grimmett, Richard F. | DISAM Journal, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1995-2002


Grimmett, Richard F., DISAM Journal


[The following are extracts from the unclassified report of the Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations as published under the above title by the Congressional Research Service (CRS) on September 22, 2003. [Tables 3 through 9D are not included in this extract.] Macro data on worldwide arms transfer agreements and deliveries are also included. The selections included herein begin with a discussion of major research findings regarding the dollar value of both arms transfer agreements and arms deliveries to the developing countries from 1995 through 2002. These findings are all cross-referenced to comparative data tables which are presented following the textual material. Special attention is given to the roles of the United States, the former Soviet Union, and China as arms suppliers, and to identification of the leading Third World arms recipient nations. The report concludes with a listing of the type and quantity of weapons delivered to developing nations by major arms suppliers in the 1995-2002 time period. Copies of the complete document are available from the Foreign Affairs and National Defense Division, Congressional Research Service, the Library of Congress, Washington DC 20540 or an electronic copy is available at http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/24641.pdf.]

Summary

This report is prepared annually to provide unclassified quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding eight calendar years. Some general data are provided on world wide conventional arms transfers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world.

Developing nations continue to be the primary focus of foreign arms sales activity by weapons suppliers. During the years 1995-2002, the value of arms transfer agreements with developing nations comprised 66.2 percent of all such agreements worldwide. More recently, arms transfer agreements with developing nations constituted 64.6 percent of all such agreements globally from 1999-2002, and 60.6 percent of these agreements in 2002.

The value of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations in 2002 was nearly $17.7 billion. This was an increase over 2001, but still the second lowest total, in real terms, for the entire period from 1995-2002. In 2001, the value of all arms deliveries to developing nations was nearly $17 billion, the lowest total in deliveries values for the entire period from 1995-2002 (in constant 2002 dollars).

Recently, from 1999-2002, the United States and Russia have dominated the arms market in the developing world, with the United States ranking first and Russia second each of the last four years in the value of arms transfer agreements. From 1999-2002, the United States made $37.8 billion in arms transfer agreements with developing nations, (in constant 2002 dollars), 41.9 percent of all such agreements. Russia, the second leading supplier during this period, made $23 billion in arms transfer agreements, or 25.5 percent. France, the third leading supplier from 1999-2002, made $4.8 billion or 5.3 percent of all such agreements with developing nations during these years.

In 2002, the United States ranked first in arms transfer agreements with developing nations with nearly $8.6 billion or 48.6 percent of these agreements. Russia was second with $5 billion or 28.3 percent of such agreements. France ranked third with $1 billion or 5.3 percent of such agreements. In 2002, the United States ranked first in the value of arms deliveries to developing nations at $7 billion, or 41 percent of all such deliveries. The United Kingdom ranked second at $3.3 billion or 19.5 percent of such deliveries. Russia ranked third at $2.9 billion or 17.1 percent of such deliveries.

During the 1999-2002 period, China ranked first among developing nations in the value of arms transfer agreements, concluding $11. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1995-2002
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.