The Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management Mobile Education Team Visits Pakistan

By Taphorn, Gary | DISAM Journal, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

The Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management Mobile Education Team Visits Pakistan


Taphorn, Gary, DISAM Journal


In response to a request from the Pakistani Ministry of Defense, the Defense Institute of Security Assistance Management (DISAM) dispatched a Mobile Education Team (MET) to Rawalpindi, Pakistan for a two-week stay in July. The four-person team conducted three security assistance classes to a total of forty Pakistani military officers and Ministry of Defense civilians. This represented a significant training opportunity for Pakistan, which has been under a variety of legislative sanctions for more than a decade.

The visit to Pakistan was DISAM's twelfth of thirteen METs scheduled during fiscal year 2003, continuing the ambitious pace of fiscal year 2002 (14 METs). Funded by Pakistan's fiscal year 2003 IMET program, the MET was led by Virginia Caudill, Director of Management Studies, and included Eddie Smith, Gary Taphorn, and U.S. Army Major Jay Conway. The principal class conducted was the two-week Foreign Purchaser's Course (SAM-F), attended by thirty civilians and officers in the grade of Major or equivalent. The students, who had extremely limited experience with security assistance, responded positively and enthusiastically to the instruction. Many commented that they could now see how their small slice of security assistance responsibilities fitted in with the big picture.

The second course conducted was the one-week Foreign Purchaser's Executive Course (SAM-FE), attended by nine brigadiers and a civilian. Like the SAM-F course, attendees represented a balanced mix across the Ministry of Defense staff, the Joint Staff Headquarter, and the three service headquarters (army, navy, and air force). Unlike the majors in SAM-F, the brigadiers represented an older generation that well remembers the hey-day of U.S. and Pakistani defense cooperation of the mid-to-late 1980s when grant military assistance to Pakistan was measured in hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

The final course was International Training (SAM-IT), taught to seven officers which the Pakistanis had identified as having responsibility for oversight of IMET and other training programs. These programs include the newly established Regional Defense Counterterrorism Fellowship Program, under which Pakistan has been allocated $1.4M in fiscal years 2002 and 2003 funds, one of the largest programs in the world. In the SAM-IT course, the Pakistanis were given access to the International Security Assistance Network (ISAN) and shown how to access and manage their country training program using both the international version of Training Management System (TMS) software and the newly developed ISAN web. Pakistan is the fourth country this year (following Brazil, Netherlands, and Bahrain) to receive SAM-IT instruction during a MET.

Mr. Muhammad Hassan, the long-time manager of Pakistan's training program in the Office of the Defense Representative to Pakistan (ODRP), was of invaluable assistance to the MET instructors in the IT course and was able to explain many of the specifics of the Pakistan program to the students. …

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