Everyone Hates the Media

By Saltzman, Joe | USA TODAY, January 1993 | Go to article overview

Everyone Hates the Media


Saltzman, Joe, USA TODAY


WHAT DO Dan Quayle, Pat Robertson, Pat Buchanan, and most of the film and television community have in common? They all hate the news media. If the conservatives would pause for a moment in their obsession with the so-called liberal cultural elite in Hollywood, they would see that their conceptions about the news media as biased and out of control are shared by the very people they criticize the most. For most of those labeled the religious right and/or the liberal elite, the complicated and diverse news media are thrown together into a single cesspool they all call "tabloid journalism."

The creative community does more than just complain about its contempt for the news media. In recent films and television movies, writers, directors, and producers have portrayed reporters as uncaring, biased, arrogant, out-to-get-you-at-all-costs gutter-rakers who care about no one and will do anything to cover a story, no matter how damaging it may be to the principals involved.

Many earlier films, often written by journalists, may have taken a dim view of the profession, but the characters usually were created with some affection and a true understanding of the journalist's role in a democratic society. The reporter more often than not was portrayed by a leading actor, so no matter how devious or obsessive the character may have been, the audience was sympathetic to him or her. After all, Clark Gable, Jimmy Cagney, Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Jean Arthur, and other matinee idols wouldn't do any real harm. They were all heroes.

In the last few decades, however, Hollywood has fallen out of love with the reporter-hero as they often were exposed to the worst aspects of entertainment journalism. Stories about them may have been partially true, exaggerated, or embroidered enough to cause pain and suffering. Most of what they have hated has been borderline journalism--supermarket tabloids eager to exploit any human weakness, inexperienced television reporters who badgered them either out of incompetence or a misguided conception of what a story was all about. As hatred of reporters has grown, even legitimate ones have found most of the Hollywood creative community hostile, suspicious of any kind of story that could embarrass or hurt them, no matter how valid it might be.

The result is an unending stream of motion pictures and television movies where the hero is hounded by a pack of shouting men and women armed with cameras and notebooks. No longer is Spencer Tracy or Humphrey Bogart the diligent reporter after the story; more often than not, it is anonymous extras posing as ill-mannered reporters who are attacking a beleaguered Bruce Willis or Diane Keaton. It doesn't matter what the movie or television program is about. More often than not, a gratuitous scene is thrown in showing reporters in the worst possible light.

"Running Mates," a recent HBO original movie, turns the media into the real villains. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Everyone Hates the Media
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.