Polanski Has His Day in Court (but He'll Be in Paris at the Time)

The Evening Standard (London, England), July 8, 2005 | Go to article overview

Polanski Has His Day in Court (but He'll Be in Paris at the Time)


Byline: PAUL CHESTON

MOVIE DIRECTOR SUES VANITY FAIR BY VIDEO TO AVOID RAPE CHARGES OSCAR-WINNING director Roman Polanski is set to launch the High Court libel trial of the year, 200 miles from London in Paris.

Polanski will make legal history when he conducts his libel case against Vanity Fair magazine not from the front row of Court 13 in the Strand but from a TV studio in the French capital.

He will be the first person to bring a contested libel claim by being questioned and cross-examined in front of a jury via video link.

Movie stars Catherine Deneuve and Nastassja Kinski are likely to feature in the evidence and Mia Farrow is set to appear in the witness box, but Polanski will watch and listen in Paris throughout the trial, which is expected to last five days.

Polanski knows that were he to take the Eurostar to Waterloo and appear personally, he would be arrested and extradited to the United States where he has the certainty of a prison sentence hanging over him.

The director of The Pianist and Rosemary's Baby pleaded guilty in 1977 to having sex with a 13-year-old girl but fled to Paris and can never return to Hollywood-A French national, who also holds a Polish passport, he is safe in Paris. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Polanski Has His Day in Court (but He'll Be in Paris at the Time)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.