Gary Stager on How Computers Will Save Music Education; Express Yourself during Your Summer Vacation!

By Stager, Gary | District Administration, July 2005 | Go to article overview

Gary Stager on How Computers Will Save Music Education; Express Yourself during Your Summer Vacation!


Stager, Gary, District Administration


One of the biggest lies in education is that computers are a threat to school art and music. Budget cuts, misplaced academic priorities or an over-emphasis on standardized testing have put the squeeze on arts programs yet I have seen no credible evidence that a choice has been made between computers and human expression.

It was a guidance counselor, not a PC, who tried to convince my parents that I should spend time in a daily study hall rather than a music theory class. Computers may save school arts and will offer unprecedented opportunities for creative development.

Forms of human expression previously off-limits to all but the most talented and elite members of society are now accessible even to young children. Animation, filmmaking, music composition, digital imaging and audio broadcasting are within reach of everybody. Ingenious software such as iLife '05 and hardware improvements turn schoolbags into portable media studios.

The Web informs us of new tools, inspiration and creative communities to support our efforts. The Internet also offers collaborators and a limitless potential audience for our creative output. The democratization of publishing and expansion of the learning community affording unprecedented collaboration and access to expertise represents the most valuable use of the Web.

Innovations abound. It is up to us to help students take advantage of emerging technology. NOTE: You may not be able to do some of these things at work since school network policies often prohibit the interesting use of computers.

Free and "nearly free" software like Finale NotePad, GarageBand, Acid and others allow students to enter the world of music composition. SmartMusic allows kids to practice along with sensitive accompaniment and e-marl their session to a teacher. See the resource box below for these urls and other sites that offer loops, instrument sounds and advice to share student compositions.

Student-composed music may be used to score their films. Elementary school kids at the Willows School in Los Angeles watch projected extreme sports footage, sans audio, and improvise scores on desktop MIDI keyboards. Students at the American School of Bombay downloaded archival audio of historic speeches and then used music composition software to bring history to life. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gary Stager on How Computers Will Save Music Education; Express Yourself during Your Summer Vacation!
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.