Dynamic Duo: Opera Divas Patricia Racette and Beth Clayton Celebrate Their Wedding and Sing out for Pride at Lincoln Center

By White, Dave | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), June 21, 2005 | Go to article overview

Dynamic Duo: Opera Divas Patricia Racette and Beth Clayton Celebrate Their Wedding and Sing out for Pride at Lincoln Center


White, Dave, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


When soprano opera star Patricia Racette and her partner of eight years, mezzo-soprano Beth Clayton, take Lincoln Center's Rose Hall stage on June 23 to perform a duet for the Charles Busch-hosted gay pride event True Colors, they'll be singing the most lesbian-identified piece of opera ever: the "Flower Duet" from Delibes's Lakme. The piece, written for two female voices, most famously underscored the seduction scene between Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon in The Hunger. It also popped up in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider and the lesbian-themed I've Heard the Mermaids Singing. "We were going to sing [Mame's] 'Bosom Buddies' instead, but then we thought it might be too trashy," jokes Racette.

But how does one convince two opera divas from the same household to perform together in the first place? "It wasn't a hard decision," says Clayton. "This year happens to be a very personal time for us because we're having a commitment ceremony on June 18, so when this came up it was serendipitous. Some jobs had shied and the time became free, so it was an easy yes. It also happens to be Pat's 40th birthday, which is fabulous. So we had all these great reasons to celebrate and to make a statement. And we love Charles Busch."

The opera world has always welcomed lesbians and gay men (although it hasn't always made it easy for stars to be publicly out). Racette and Clayton have never been personally or professionally closeted and still enjoy flourishing careers. Clayton recently appeared in the Lyric Opera of Chicago's production of William Bolcom's A Wedding, directed by Robert Altman. As for Racette, she just wrapped up a starring role in the Houston Grand Opera's production of Falstaff, "where about 50% of the cast [was] gay. That was unusual, but fun," and is currently booked for the next few years. The pair's official coming-out in print, though, happened when Racette was profiled in a cover story of a 2002 issue of Opera News, a story written by Busch's partner, Eric Myers, and in which Clayton participated as well. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Dynamic Duo: Opera Divas Patricia Racette and Beth Clayton Celebrate Their Wedding and Sing out for Pride at Lincoln Center
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.